Anne Elliott

Anne Elliott

Posted on 06/26/2014


Photo taken on June 19, 2014


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Coccinella septempunctata
Calgary
Coccinellidae
Coleoptera
beauty in nature
Coccinella
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Anne Elliott
non-native
Seven-spotted Ladybug
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Alberta
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nature
insect
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plant
close-up
ladybug
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my back yard
introduced
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Plain and simple

Plain and simple
"Just" a tiny Seven-spotted Ladybug, seen in my back garden on 19 June 2014.

"The Seven-spotted Lady Beetle (Coccinella septempunctata) is probably our most familiar Lady Beetle, being found in gardens, parks and natural areas across the continent. It wasn't always this way though - this, large, attractive beetle was brought over in the 1950's from Europe to the eastern US to supplement the aphid-eating prowess of the native lady beetles. This hardy alien has since spread across the continent.

There is concern that this alien lady beetle is causing a decline in some native lady beetle species, particularly of the once common Transverse Lady Beetle. Are the robust Seven-spots out-competing the natives, eating the eggs of the natives, spreading disease or hybridizing with natives? No one knows for sure, but it is another cautionary example of the dangers of introducing alien species. One thing that ecologically conscientious gardeners can do is to refrain from buying alien species as biological controls and purchase native ones instead." From talkaboutwildlife.ca (no longer available).

"The Seven-spotted Ladybird Beetle was brought in from Europe in the hope that it would help control populations of pests like aphids. It is doubtful that it has made any real difference, but what has happened is some of our native species have suffered a decline in populations since the Seven-spotted was introduced, perhaps because the Seven-spotted outcompetes them. Two-spotted Ladybird Beetles are the ones that most often turn up in people's homes in winter. Perhaps the best solution to ensure the beetles survive is to take them to a greenhouse that uses biocontrol."

www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/natural/insects/bugsfaq/ladybir...

John Acorn's book, "Ladybugs of Alberta", covers all 75 species of ladybugs found here in Alberta.

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