Anne Elliott

Anne Elliott

Posted on 10/01/2013


Photo taken on September 23, 2013


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Alberta
Canada
SE Alberta
Red Rock Coulee
erosion
coulee
rock
layers
scenery
texture
landscape
patterns
nature
plants
bushes
badlands


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Erosion at Red Rock Coulee

Erosion at Red Rock Coulee
Another landscape photo taken at Red Rock Coulee in SE Alberta. We left Calgary on Monday morning, 20 September 2013, and had to reach Elkwater in the Cypress Hills (not that far from the Saskatchewan border), several hours' drive away, where we were going to stay in a little rustic cabin for three nights. On the way there, we stopped at Red Rock Coulee, which is just 56 kms (35 mi) southwest of Medicine Hat. Actually, this particular photo was taken on Monday, 23 September 2013, when we called in again, this time walking down the hillside and into one of the coulees. While my friends searched for Lichens, I wandered around, taking photos of the scenery and anything else I came across. These eroded, layered hills are similar to some of those seen in places like Drumheller and DInosaur Provincial Park. The extremely high winds were not pleasant at all, to say the least! In fact, strong winds were everywhere in many parts of SE Alberta. I was expecting a lot of my photos to be very blurry, as I could barely keep my balance or hold my camera. Amazingly, most seem to be OK to use, from the very quick look I've taken so far. This is Rattlesnake territory, too, but fortunately we didn't come across any, thank goodness! At least, not here, but one was seen (not by me!) at the Pinhorn Grazing Lease, when we were monitoring the Yucca plants.

"The main feature of this natural landscape is the huge red boulders; some measuring 2.5 m across. They are scattered over a relatively small distance. Bedrock is close to the surface in this area, covered by only a thin layer of soil. Water erosion has carved the landscape over time and a badlands topography has formed in places. The bands of colour visible in the exposed bedrock are made of dark gray shales, greenish and gray sandstones, bentonitic clays and thin bands of ironstone.

The most striking features of this landscape are the round reddish boulders. These are sandstone concretions and at up to 2.5 m in diameter, they are among the largest in the world. The boulders were formed in prehistoric seas as layers of sand, calcite and iron oxide collected around a nucleus formed by shells, leaves or bones. The concretions grew larger as the circulating waters deposited more layers. The reddish colour comes from iron oxide." From Wikipedia.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Rock_Coulee

LeapFrog has particularly liked this photo


6 comments - The latest ones
LeapFrog
LeapFrog
Lovely designs from the continuous erosion ... an excellent wide-angle and a beautiful sky!! Well taken and very nicely presented!!

PS: I hope they fixed up Dinosaur Provincial Park ... it was a tad disappointing in the early 70's ... but if they transformed it like the Museum in Drumheller, it should be a great place to visit!!
3 years ago.
Anne Elliott has replied to LeapFrog
Thanks, Art! I haven't been to Dinosaur Provincial Park for 30+ years, when the kids were young, but I know they have made changes to it, that I would imagine have improved the place. Would love to go out there.
3 years ago.
pajmcb
pajmcb
WOW!...Amazing picture!

An Excellent View!!
Seen in

'Scapes!!
3 years ago.
Cats 99
Cats 99
Very much like the badlands! I love this type of landscape!
3 years ago.
Joan+
Joan+
Cracking shot, texture and landscape perfect!

An Excellent View!!
Seen in
'Scapes!!
3 years ago.
Ken Beath
Ken Beath
Has a lot of character. The notes claim that it is a natural landscape, when I see somehing like that in Australia it always seems to be the result of overgrazing.
3 years ago.