Anne Elliott

Anne Elliott

Posted on 08/23/2013


Photo taken on August 21, 2013


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Dock details

Dock details
Dock is such a beautiful colour and fascinating in its details. This flower was seen and photographed yesterday, 21 August 2013, when a group of us visited Keith Logan's property again. Keith and his wife, Sandy, live on a 35-acre piece of land, NW of Cochrane. After enjoying seeing a lot of Keith's stunning photography and incredible woodwork, and enjoying coffee and the most delicious cheese scones and spicy scones straight out of the oven, we then walked on their land to record all flora and fauna seen. We all agree - if you sit in one of Keith's chairs, you'll see that no chair could ever be more comfortable - they are simply amazing! Thanks to Keith and his wife, Sandy, for such an enjoyable day!

www.keithlogan.com/Keith_Logan/Photography/Photography.html

www.keithlogan.com/Keith_Logan/Woodworking/Woodworking.html

"The docks and sorrels, genus Rumex L., are a genus of about 200 species of annual, biennial and perennial herbs in the buckwheat family Polygonaceae. Members of this family are very common perennial herbs growing mainly in the northern hemisphere, but various species have been introduced almost everywhere. Some are nuisance weeds (and are sometimes called dockweed or dock weed), but some are grown for their edible leaves.

The usually inconspicuous flowers are carried above the leaves in clusters. The fertile flowers are mostly hermaphrodite, or they may be functionally male or female. The flowers and seeds grow on long clusters at the top of a stalk emerging from the basal rosette; in many species the flowers are green, but in some (such as sheep's sorrel, Rumex acetosella) the flowers and their stems may be brick-red." From Wikipedia.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumex

Two species of Rumex have been seen on the Logan's land - Garden Sorrel, Rumex acetosa, S4 (i.e. apparently secure), and Western Dock, Rumex aquaticus/occidentalis, R. (i.e. rare) - and I''m not sure which one is seen in my macro photo.

LeapFrog has particularly liked this photo


Comments
LeapFrog
LeapFrog
Great colours and wavy patterns on this one Anne ... great find and well taken!! Amazing clarity and textures too ... well done ...
4 years ago.
Nourel Lind
Nourel Lind
Très belle photo !!
4 years ago.
Stan Askew
Stan Askew
superb floral ... fine work!
4 years ago.
Cats 99
Cats 99
I have not heard of this before - it's a beautiful flower - very interesting looking!
4 years ago.