Doug Wall

Doug Wall

Posted on 01/19/2016


Photo taken on September  7, 2014



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Canterbury
Abbot's Mill


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Abbot's Mill

Abbot's Mill
There once stood on this site one of Kent's largest mills, destroyed by fire on 17 October 1933. It was the largest building in Canterbury outside of the cathedral. Before that there was an ancient mill on the site owned by Abbot of St Augustine’s monastery, hence its original name, Abbot’s Mill.

Corn mills have been recorded in Canterbury since the time of William the Conqueror. At the time of King Stephen [1135-1154] it is known that there were at least twelve in the city and on hills close by, many belonging to the monks of Christ Church. The mill owned by the Abbot of St Augustine’s monastery was purchased in King Stephen’s time by Abbot Hugh for the use of the monastery.

Following the suppression of the monastery by King Henry VIII the mill came into the King’s hands but was acquired by Canterbury Corporation in 1543. It was known as Brown’s Mill for many years [after the occupier] but reverted to Abbots mill in 1791. The new building, costing £8000, was built in 1792 and was originally designed as a granary by John Smeaton [who also designed the Eddystone lighthouse]. The building was 60 feet square in plan, and six storeys tall. The base was brick and the upper five storeys were wood, clad in white painted weatherboarding. There were two waterwheels driving a total of eight pairs of stones. In 1896 it was bought by Denne's and was thereafter known as Denne’s Mill, though it was sometimes called the White Mill. There were two waterwheels driving a total of eight pairs of stones.

Apparently, when it caught fire in 1933 the timber-frame burnt for seven days and nights, half a million gallons of water were poured on the flames and the streets were lined with spectators.

There is a project, The Abbot’s Mill project, which aims to re-instate a water wheel into the old mill race which will generate electricity for an education centre about sustainable living, renewable energy and the importance of the River Stour in the history of Canterbury’s development

William Sutherland, Martin Humphreys have particularly liked this photo


Comments
Martin Humphreys
Martin Humphreys
Like this one Doug .. great info too.
19 months ago.
Doug Wall has replied to Martin Humphreys
Thank you Martin.
19 months ago.
William Sutherland
William Sutherland
Outstanding capture!

Admired in:
www.ipernity.com/group/tolerance
19 months ago.