Doug Wall

Doug Wall

Posted on 10/17/2015


Photo taken on October  2, 2015


See also...

Tolerance Tolerance


City Shots City Shots


Street Live! Street Live!


New Flickr Survivors New Flickr Survivors


Streets Streets


Towns of the world Towns of the world


Street Photography Europe Street Photography Europe


See more...

Keywords

Denmark
Copenhagen


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

298 visits

Nanny State?

Nanny State?
I was going to write how refreshing it was to see cyclists everywhere cycling without a helmet and not feeling guilty [like when I was a young]. In Copenhagen, cycling is VERY popular, there are bikes everywhere. Even train carriages marked for cyclists. There are dedicated bike lanes everywhere in the city. And that’s it I suppose. They are DEDICATED bike lanes, not simply a hundred yards of normal road marked out as a bike lane, created just to attract funding, that starts from nowhere and goes nowhere and has cars parked in it so you have to swerve out into the traffic anyway....
475 cyclists were seriously injured on London's streets during 2013, including 14 fatalities. I don’t know the figures since then but on average 18 cyclists are killed every year in London. Even with helmets on. I must admit, if I cycled in London I would wear a helmet.....but then I wouldn’t cycle in London.....

John Linton, William Sutherland, Alain D, Thérèse have particularly liked this photo


19 comments - The latest ones
Alain D
Alain D
London is dangerous ???
22 months ago.
Doug Wall has replied to Alain D
If you're a cyclist, I think so.....
22 months ago.
Jaap van 't Veen
Jaap van 't Veen
Nice city scene.
22 months ago.
Richard Gawthorpe
Richard Gawthorpe
great shot great imfo doug it is the same in Amsterdam
22 months ago.
Doug Wall has replied to Richard Gawthorpe
Yes Richard, safer too....

Thanks for visiting.
22 months ago.
William Sutherland
William Sutherland
Terrific street shot! Glad to see people have a choice!

An outstanding photo viewed in Street Live!
www.ipernity.com/group/343457
22 months ago.
Doug Wall has replied to William Sutherland
Thanks for commenting William.
22 months ago.
HappySnapper
HappySnapper
Got knocked off my bike in London once and I was already stationery with my left foot on the kerb. The driver never stopped I,m glad to say! Should have checked his mirror as a police car was right behind him.
22 months ago.
Doug Wall has replied to HappySnapper
Thanks for commenting Maurice. Glad you weren't badly hurt. I too have been knocked off a bike - by a delivery van in a hurry. The lady driver did at least stop and apologise.
22 months ago.
notkansas64
notkansas64
Cycling in London is vastly better now than I found as a courier in the 80s/90s. We are no longer moving targets for a hostile majority of drivers. Vulnerability makes you safe, or at least an appearance of it. Old ladies on Raleigh 20s in the 80s actually survived alongside the MTBer couriers on Marble Arch, Trafalgar Square, E&C, Vauxhall Cross. So no helmets please. Dashboard bayonets not Airbags, that's the answer. Nice photo.
22 months ago. Edited 22 months ago.
Doug Wall has replied to notkansas64
Thank you very much for your visit and your comments.
22 months ago.
Eunice Perkins
Eunice Perkins
Lovely wide street!
22 months ago.
Doug Wall has replied to Eunice Perkins
They are Eunice. That's London's problem......
21 months ago.
Don Barrett (aka DBs travels)
Don Barrett (aka DBs…
We've had a dramatic increase in bike lanes in California, but they often seem to be too much like what Doug was suggesting -- built because there were funds available. There are many quite good bike paths, but too many are good for a short stretch and then dump you in a situation where cars and bikes don't mix well.
21 months ago.
Clint
Clint
Back before some health issues a few years back, I was a heavy all-weather rider in Chicago. I was pretty comfortable riding here back then, though the infrastructure was nothing like what you see in this picture. The mayor has since invested heavily in all sorts of new and complicated bikes lanes that I tend to think are counterproductive, but I'm in the minority of bicyclists on that.

Even so, I've been hit enough--once very badly--that I'm obsessive about helmets. There's a good chance I'd have been killed in 2008 if I hadn't been wearing a helmet, and the helmet I was wearing broke into four pieces. I don't tell anybody else what to do, and I very strongly don't want there to be a helmet law, but I don't ride without a helmet.
21 months ago.
Doug Wall has replied to Clint
Thanks for commenting Clint. There are so many cyclists in the city that maybe motorists are extra considerate. I find the accepted road practice in various countries interesting. I the UK it is normal to cross a road anywhere you can. In my town there are pedestrian crossings but some people ignore them if it means walking 20 yards out of their way. When I learnt to drive (admittedly a long time ago) I was taught that the pedestrian ALWAYS has the right of way - simply because if you hit one you would kill or seriously injure the person, not because that person should be in the road. In another town near where I live they have an area where motorists and pedestrians share the road equally. I hesitate to put this to the test, if I stood my ground against a car I know who would come of worse if we collided...

In Copenhagen we were advised that motorists always have the right of way. There are pedestrian lights at virtually every road junction. Locals do not cross on red even if there are no vehicles in sight. There was a spot where construction work meant that the road was closed but people still obeyed the lights! We were told that you could be arrested for not obeying the pedestrian lights so we did like everybody else, apart from the odd tourist.

In downtown Vancouver it's sensible to obey pedestrian lights though generally I found motorists considerate in residential areas. In New York I would cross where and when you are supposed to, in London I would cross where I thought it safe (but I was born and bred a Londoner).

In the UK if you simply stand at a zebra crossing (a crossing place marked with white bands but without lights to stop traffic) drivers will generally stop in both directions immediately. In Italy and France you can be standing on the crossing and traffic will still whiz by.......
21 months ago.
Don Barrett (aka DBs… has replied to Doug Wall
Enforcement of pedestrian crossing laws goes in waves (and by class/ethnicity) in the major cities in California. There will be long periods where pedestrian crossing laws aren't enforced, and then some city will get strict about them for a year or so. Of course, almost everywhere in the U.S., if you're nonwhite or look possibly like you're homeless, the rules are enforced (or interpreted) much more strictly.
21 months ago.
Clint has replied to Doug Wall
Here in Chicago, there is virtually no enforcement of any traffic law anywhere, so people tend to do whatever they feel like they can get away with doing without being killed. Nobody on foot pays any attention to crosswalks or signals. We all just cross wherever we want whenever we think it's safe enough to make it through alive. My own policy in the city, regardless of whether I'm on foot, on a bike, or in a car is to do whatever I can without impeding somebody with the legal right of way, without getting a ticket, and without getting myself or somebody else killed. I have to remind myself that the rules are different when I go other places.
21 months ago.