Bindubaba

Bindubaba

Posted on 04/18/2012


Photo taken on March 21, 2012


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africa
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murchison falls
hartebeest


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hartebeest

hartebeest
The hartebeest is a large, fawn-colored antelope that at first glance seems strangely put together and less elegant than other antelopes. However, being one of the most recent and highly evolved ungulates, it is far from clumsy. In fact, it is one of the fastest antelopes and most enduring runners. These qualities gave rise to its name, which means "tough ox." Its sedentary lifestyle seems to inhibit the mixing of populations and gene flow; as a result, there are several subspecies of hartebeest.
Habitat
Hartebeest are mainly found in medium and tall grasslands, including savannas. They are more tolerant of high grass and woods than other alcelaphines (archetypical plains antelopes).
Behavior
The social organization of the hartebeest is somewhat different than that of other antelopes. Adult females do not form permanent associations with other adults; instead, they are often accompanied by up to four generations of their young. Female offspring remain close to their mothers up to the time they give birth to calves of their own. Even male offspring may remain with their mothers for as long as 3 years, an unusually long bonding period. As groups of females move in and out of male territories, the males sometimes chase away the older offspring. Their mothers become defensive and protect them from the males. Although bachelor herds of young males are also formed, they are less structured than those of some antelopes, and age classes are not as conspicuous.
Young are born throughout the year, but conception and breeding peaks may be influenced by the availability of food. The behavior of the female hartebeest when she gives birth is very different from that of the wildebeest. Instead of calving in groups on open plains, the hartebeest female isolates herself in scrub areas to give birth and leaves the young calf hidden for a fortnight, only visiting it briefly to suckle.

sasithorn_s has particularly liked this photo


Comments
sasithorn_s
sasithorn_s
Stunning capture of this great hartebeest! Thanks for the interesting info too.

Seen in : NATURE 200% UNLIMITED
3 years ago.
Diko G W
Diko G W
Great shot wonderful info thanks for sharing
Seen & enjoyed in Animals in the Wild Animals in the Wild
3 years ago.
Kris W (Formerly kmw1018 on Flickr)
Kris W (Formerly kmw…
Seen and admired in "Animals in the Wild"
3 years ago.
Jeff Farley
Jeff Farley
An odd looking antelope Bindu - super capture.

Excellent image, thank you very much for posting to Fur, Fin and Feather.
13 months ago.