280/366: 160th Flower of Spring & Summer: Tiny Stalk of Lilies

The Flowers of Spring & Summer!


I have decided to have a counting of each kind of flower that I find on our property this spring and summer! I saw the first flower in early February and it's the smallest flower too! Next I found a little white flower that looks ready for a mouse's wedding bouquet! Number three were the crocus flowers that popped out in one big clump of loveliness! Then I discovered the Henderson Shooting Star, b…  (read more)

Low Hop Clover: The 66th Flower of Spring & Summer…

26 Apr 2012 98
Until I began trying to identify the flowers that grow on our property, I had no idea how many kinds of clover species there are! In fact, there are lots of flowers that have three leaves that aren't clovers but are in that genus. It's pretty interesting, but so confusing!! This is the tiny Low Hop Clover, named because it resembles Hop flowers . It's native to Europe and Western Asia, but has been naturalized in much of the United States because it's such a good source of nutrition for livestock, and it also replenishes soil. These useful qualities make it the third most important clover in agriculture! If you would like to know more about this clover, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Low Hop Clover (Trifolium campestre)

I See You (Explore #23!) [+1 in a note]

27 Apr 2012 118
[+1 in a note above] One of the reasons I love Flickr so much is the inspiration I get from the pictures I see. I once saw an image of a single wild oat taken directly from above and it was so totally cool and awesome that it completely changed the way I see natural subjects. I am always on the lookout for that super cool top-down view that isolates a simple subject and makes it special. Yesterday I posted pictures of a False Dandilion , and if you'll look at the second picture I posted, you'll see some buds from a side view. Here we get to see what a bud looks like when it's trying to impersonate the Eye of Sauron from the Lord of the Rings! I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) Explored on June 12, 2012, placement at #33

Chinese Caps: the 67th Flower of Spring & Summer!

27 Apr 2012 1 1 133
Without question, this is the strangest looking wildflower I've seen on our property! When I took this picture, I originally thought it was Miner's Lettuce that was going to seed. I remember at the time that it seemed a little odd looking, but it was very small so I waited until I saw it on my computer to look closer. That's when I said outloud, "THAT'S NOT MINER'S LETTUCE!" But the question was, what the heck was it? After looking through my flower books, I found myself staring at a blossom called a Chinese Cap! Chinese Caps are native to the western edge of North America and are commonly found in shady areas during the spring and early summer where it is cool. Being small and almost entirely green, it's not easily noticed unless carefully looked for. There are over 2,000 species in the "Euphorbia" genus, which are also referred to as "Spurges. I was surprised to find out that this plant is closely related to Poinsettias! Finally, the plants cause minor dermatitis and inflamation if touched and should be kept away from children and plant-munching pets! A very odd but cool-looking flower indeed, and one that I'm really happy to have discovered! If you would like to know more about this type of "Spurges", Wiki has a great source of information here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbia

Sea of Seablush

24 Apr 2012 94
In the heart of springtime, our big meadow turns pink with the blossoms of Shortspur Seablush. This is my attempt to show the beauty of this display!

Yarrow: The 68th Flower of Spring & Summer!

27 Apr 2012 1 191
Flower buds can be as dramatic as a blossom, and to me, this Yarrow looks like popcorn tightly covered with spider webs, surrounded by soft green, feathery fronds. I'll be showing the blossoms in the next week or so, and if you've never seen this flower, you'll be surprised to see what it looks like when this Yarrow's petals open wide! Yarrow is found all over the Northern Hemisphere and in the southwestern United States, it's also known as plumajillo, or "little feather" because of the shape of its leaves. This flower is known by many names, including "herbal militaris" because of its use in stopping blood flow. In fact, Yarrow is an extremely valuable medicinal herb and is used in the treatment of seemingly countless ailments ! Yarrow is also used in shampoo, though overuse can cause one's skin to become overly sensitive to sunlight. It's also used in teas as a sedative. And it's even used in various liquors and bitters! In fact, there are so many uses for Yarrow that it seems like one of those "miracle elixers" that can cure everything and be used for anything! Yet, the list of things this herb is used for is amazing! I had no idea that this common, beautiful flower is so powerful as a medicinal herb and more! If you'd like additional information about this awesome flower, Wiki has an excellent page here: Wiki: Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Rear View (Explore #25!)

21 Apr 2012 93
Back in April, I posted the 35th Flower of Spring, the Narrowleaf Mule's Ear. This flashy flower is in the Aster family, and has a strong resemblance to sunflowers. They grow all over our hillside and I had a lot of fun taking pictures of these when they were in bloom. Here's one of my favorite shots, I taken from behind with the sun glowing through the petals. I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) Explored on June 15, 2012 placement at #32

Large Periwinkle: the 69th Flower of Spring & Summ…

27 Apr 2012 125
There seems to be no end to the number of flowers that grow here on our property! I don't have an actual number at this point but it's well over 100 and I keep finding more almost every day!! Most of the flowers are wild, and though a smaller version of this flower is actually naturalized here in Oregon, this is one of the plants that was here when we moved and we love its deep green leaves and blue-violet-purple flowers! The Large Periwinkle is native to southern Europe, as well as the Caucuses and Turkey. The smaller but nearly identical Common Periwinkle has also been naturalized in various parts of the United States, including Oregon. In fact, just down the road from our house, I've found it growing wild and it was fun to recognize it there! I was fascinated to discover how to easily tell the difference between the two types: if the leaves have fuzzy edges, it's the Large Periwinkle or "Vinca Major" and if the leaves are smooth, it's the Common Periwinkle or "Vinca Minor". These plants are usually evergreens and are very popular choices for gardens due to their hardiness and ground-covering nature. If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Large Periwinkle (Vinca major) Explored on June 15, 2012, placement at #210

Tolmie's Mariposa Lily: The 70th Flower of Spring…

27 Apr 2012 156
When I saw this flower the first time, I could hardly believe my eyes, and as I stared in wonder, it instantly became one of my favorites as well. What a WEIRD flower!! It looks like it came from another planet! It's nicknamed "Pussy Ear" because of its similarity to a cat's fuzzy ears, and I agree! This beautiful, unusual lily grows all over our property from one end to the other, except in our meadows and at the height of its blooming season, there are hundreds upon hundreds of these wonderful blossoms to admire. I'll have more pictures to share but for now, this and the one below will be my entries for the 70th Flower! :) I was surprised to find that this flower is in a genus with about 70 other species which share this recognizable shape and can be found throughout North America. In fact, one species is Utah's State Flower ! If you would like more information about this amazing lily, Wiki has a very nice, picture-laden page here: Wiki: Calochortus

Giant Blue-Eyed Mary: The 71st Flower of Spring &…

29 Apr 2012 96
I am always delighted when I see these flowers blooming in the springtime. I think they are both unusual looking and extremely beautiful with their two-toned blue and white coloring. They only grow in a very small area on our property (the space of about 200 feet) but where they grow, they are all over the place! Giant Blue-Eyed Marys are native to western North America from British Columbia to northern California. These flowers grow low to the ground but are about the size of a golf-ball when all of the flowers have bloomed. They are called "Giant" because other flowers in this genus, of which there are about 20 species, don't have as large a display of blossoms, and their flowers are smaller. Surprisingly, these Blue-Eyed Marys are related to a very different looking flower I posted a few days ago, English Plantains !

Sticky Cinquefoil: the 72nd Flower of Spring & Sum…

30 Apr 2012 1 1 130
Here's a flower I used to call a Wild Strawberry ...until I looked it up and discovered that I was totally wrong...oops!! :D It's funny how many times I've discovered that I've been incorrect about so many flowers! One of the things I really enjoy about this flower project is that I learn so much about everything that grows here, and I can correct my errors as I go! Sticky Cinquefoil is native to western United States from southwestern Canada to California and gets its name from the sticky hairs that cover its stems. There are about 11 subspecies of this beauty, and I was surprised to find out that it will hybridize with the Beach Strawberry ! Finally, this flower is a popular food for mice!

I Am SOOOOO HAPPY To See You!!

Great Hound's Tongue Blossom & Seed Pods (Explore…

27 Apr 2012 1 136
Back in March I posted the bud form of the Great Hound's Tongue . Here is the last blossom of a group of flowers with plump red pods on the left and right, full of maturing seeds. Below is a picture that should make just about anyone blush and then laugh out loud! It's a pair of seed pods but, well...it doesn't take much imagination to see what it looks like! Definately one of my funniest shots! :D I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) Explored on June 18, 2012, placement #365

Bare-stem Desert Parsley: The 73rd Flower of Sprin…

30 Apr 2012 180
Here's an image I'm not very happy with. It was a windy day when I took pictures of this flower, and though I took many shots and upped my ISO, this is the only one that came out without blur. I remember now that I planned to take more pictures on another day, but sadly, it didn't happen. I wanted show this in full bloom and at least, a better quality example, but this will have to do! Well, at least I captured a happy Carpet Beetle in the image to add a festive atmosphere! :D This flower is one of about 75 species in the "Lomatium" genus, all of which are native to western North America. They are also commonly known as "biscuit roots" because of their edible roots, and are a traditional food of Native Americans. The roots are cooked, dried and ground into flour, or ground raw into a mush and formed into cakes and stored for future meals.They are said to taste like celery, parsnip or old biscuits. One species is useful in the treatment of upper respiratory infections, coughing, and tuberculosis!

Swamp Buttercup: The 74th Flower of Spring & Summe…

30 Apr 2012 2 121
You may not believe the color of this flower, but it really was neon yellow!! I wouldn't have been surprised if this tiny blossom glowed in the dark! This was the only picture I got of this species, in bud form, as it was gone when I went back to take a picture of it opened! The deer around here are horrible!! I have finally learned to make a deer repellent spray and am going around and adding some protection to the flowers I would like to take pictures of before they are gobbled up by the wildlife! The Swamp Buttercup is in an enormous genus of flowers called "Ranuncululs", which boasts over 600 species!! They are found all over the world and are almost always yellow with shiny petals. Buttercups are poisonous and animals that eat them will get blistering in their mouths and digestive problems from head to tail. In fact, handling thest flowers will cause dermatitis, so this is yet another flower that one should admire but not touch! :) If you would like to know more about the flowers in the Ranunculus genus, Wiki has a very nice page here: Wiki: Ranunculus

Hairy Vetch: The 75th Flower of Spring & Summer!

02 May 2012 123
This beautiful wildflower erupts during the late spring in a near carpet of purple all over our property, especially in our meadows but also in our lower forest. I love the graceful appearance of each blossom, aren't they lovely?! This flower is native to Europe and western Asia. It's part of the legume, or pea, famliy, and is grown as a forage crop for livestock. It's now found all over the United States and Australia. Vetch is an important crop for revitalizing soil that need nitrogen, and is often planted as a companion to certain plants like tomatoes, which need nitrogen-rich soil. If you would like to know more about Hairy Vetch, Wiki has a page here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicia_villosa

Bottlebrush Berry: The 76th Flower of Spring & Sum…

02 May 2012 107
To be honest, I have no idea what the name of this flower is! I spent a long time looking at every source I could find, with no luck, and I've never seen anything even remotely similar to this plant, except for Bottlebrush, which is a large shrub with huge flowers. So until I discover the correct name, this is called Bottlebrush Berry! :D The only place this flower grows is down by our front gate, and to see it from a standing position, it looks like nothing special at all. But what a surprise I got when I knelt down to take a closer look!! I kept an eye on these flowers and discovered that they bloom from the top down, which is unusual in my experience because it's normally the other way around. As it continues to blossom, the gorgeous red flowers turns brown and ratty looking when they die, so I decided that this picture shows this flower off at its finest. This plant grows about two feet high and has lots of these flowers all over, which attract bees and butterflies galore! I hope to properly identify this beauty, and when I do, I'll update the information. I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :)

Tall Western Groundsel: the 77th Flower of Spring…

02 May 2012 94
When I see this flower, all I can do is wrinkle my nose and sing some lyrics to a most appropriate song.. U-G-L-Y you ain't got no alibi, you're just ugly U-G-L-Y but you never wonder why you're so ugly U-G-L-Y you ain't got no alibi, you're just ugly U-G-L-Y you ain't got no alibi, you're just ug, ugly ugly Photo subjects that I think are ugly or boring to look at give me a challenge: How do I make this ratty-looking flower look attractive? I took lots of pictures from different angles and in the end, I was suprsied to find that I'd succeeded--at least for me! You'll have to let me know what you think! :) This flower is native to western and central North America and grows in open forests and wetlands. Some flowers have normal daisy-like heads with petals forming a pretty star...but others, like the ones on our property, have only a few petals on each head. Western Groundsel is poisonous to livestock and can cause minor dermatitus if handled. I would also like to add that it is very offensive to the eyes! Its scientific name should be Butticus uglius ! :D However, butterflies love it so it can stay! :D I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :)

Oregon Sunshine: the 78th Flower of Spring & Summe…

01 Jun 2012 137
What a perfect name for this bright and cheery flower! Growing in lovely bouquets of yellow flowers, these plants grow all over our property, bringing smiles and happiness to anyone who sees them! :) Also known as the Common Wooly Sunflower., this flower is native to western North America, and is found from southern Canada to southern California. There are about twelve species of "Eriophyllum" and the first was collected by the Lewis and Clark expedition in Idaho in 1906! If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Eriophyllum I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :)

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