280/366: 160th Flower of Spring & Summer: Tiny Stalk of Lilies

The Flowers of Spring & Summer!


I have decided to have a counting of each kind of flower that I find on our property this spring and summer! I saw the first flower in early February and it's the smallest flower too! Next I found a little white flower that looks ready for a mouse's wedding bouquet! Number three were the crocus flowers that popped out in one big clump of loveliness! Then I discovered the Henderson Shooting Star, b…  (read more)

Seepspring Monkeyflower: The 50th Flower of Spring…

20 Apr 2012 103
[best appreciated at full size against black] WOO HOO!!! I've reached Number 50!! How many flowers will I find before I'm done? I am going to guess somewhere about 100! Let's find out, shall we? :) If you've been visiting my photostream for a while, this flower will look familiar to you! The 16th Flower of Spring is the Chickweed Monkeyflower, and if you didn't see them side-by-side, you'd think they might be the same flower. However, this species has flowers that measure about 1" in diameter, and the Chickweed Monkeyflower is only 1/4" in diameter! These two flowers grow in the same place, but as the Chickweed Monkeyflowers are dying away, the Seepsprings take over! The Seepspring Monkeyflower is in the genus "Mimulus," includes about 150 species and can be found world-wide. They get their name from the resemblance of some species to a monkey's face. This species is found in places where the ground is very wet, and are only found here on our property. Rain water runs down off of our hillside, through the meadow and down through the valley below, making this area almost bog-like during sprintime. I was interested to find out that monkeyflowers accumulate salt in their leaves and stems, and were used as a salt substitute to flavor wild game by Native Americans and pioneers. It also has medicinal uses; the juice squeezed from the plant's foliage has been used as a soothing poultice for minor burns and skin irritations. If you would like to know more about monkeyflowers, Wiki has a great source of information here: Wiki: Monkyeflower (Mimulus) . This image was taken in April, 2012.

Details, Details

15 Mar 2012 1 119
[best appreciated at full size against black] Back in February, an explosion of pearly white crocus erupted out of the ground in our garden and created an amazing display for me to enjoy and take pictures of. Here is a macro showing the crocus stigma. I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) NOTE! I have finally updated my profile and I hope you'll take a look to find out a little more about me and how important all of you are to my experience here on Flickr! Janet's Profile (sfhipchick) This image was taken in March, 2012.

Bi-Colored Flaxflower: The 51st Flower of Spring!

10 May 2012 146
One of my very favorite flowers, this perfect little star pops up in blankets of white and pink all over our meadows from about May to July! I adore their bright and shiny, perfect little faces and make a point to stop and get nose-close to appreciate them whenever I see them! I'll be posting another picture of this beauty in perfect pink, and I think you'll agree, it's hard to decide which color is prettier! Darling and tiny, this flower measures 1/3" in diameter and is native to the Pacific Northwest, from Baja, California to British Columbia. It grows in low-to mid elevation and does fine in dry environments. If you would like to know a little more about this flower, visit this page: Baby Stars

Star of Bethlehem Lily: The 52nd Flower of Spring!

24 Apr 2012 1 136
After a long work project, I'm finally DONE and finally able to post to Flickr and comment again! YAY!!! I'm so excited!! I've missed all of you SO MUCH! I miss seeing all of your wonderful pictures and reading your comments. I have made so many super friends here and it's been very hard to have no time to visit and put up pictures! Well, I'm BACK and ready for action! :D When Steve and I moved here, I discovered that the people who lived here before us planted a number of diffeerent bulbs: daffodils, jonquils, crocus, bearded iris, grape hyacinth, garlic, and these! Thank you so much to Blunder for letting me know what flower this is! YAY! I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) NOTE! I have finally updated my profile and I hope you'll take a look to find out a little more about me and how important all of you are to my experience here on Flickr! www.flickr.com/people/sfhipchick/ This image was taken in April , 2012.

Changing Forget-Me-Not: The 53rd Flower of Spring!

20 Apr 2012 80
This is another one of my favorite flowers which grows on our property. It's very tiny, with each blossom measuring only 1/16" in diameter; the cluster of blossoms unroll similar to a Popcornflower, but instead of having just white flowers, these blossoms slowly change from white to yellow and finally to blue! Amazing! Thanks to Joe Banana for letting me know what this flower is called!! The Changing Forget-Me-Not is native to Europe and is an introduced species which can be found all over the United States now. It favors disturbed areas, but on our property it is happy growing just about anywhere, especially where it's cool with some moisture in the soil. This image was taken in April, 2012.

Common Brodiaea: The 54th Flower of Spring!

24 Apr 2012 126
The flower count continues!! Since it is now about to become June, I'll rename my set "The Flowers of Spring and Summer"! There seems to be no end to the flowers I'm finding! I predicted I'd find about 100 and I may have already found that number, and we've only gotten to June!! So far I've processed up to #75 and I probably have another 25 flowers that I have yet to process! Craziness!! It is a challenge to take pictures of them all, and I am sure I'll have missed some...there's too much ground to cover and not enough time! :D It's a lot of fun though, and I really do wonder what the final count will be when the flowers are all done for the year! :D The lovely Common Brodiaea pops up all over our property, both in the wooded areas and in our meadows too. It's a common perennial flower, which can be different shades of purple and blue-purple, is found in the western United States and northern Mexico. This flower's bulb, or corm, was an important food source for Native Americans. Sometimes eaten raw, they were usually roasted or boiled for a sweeter flavor. Tribes were careful not to harvest too many and would separate corms they dug up, leaving at least one behind so more would grow the next year. They also planted seeds, which grow easily but because it's a perennial, will not flower for several years. An interesting fact: burned areas seems to cause these plants to burst into life afterwards and are sometimes the first plants to show up in a fire-ravaged area! If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a very nice page here: Common Brodiaea (Dichelostemma capitatum) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Western Wild Cucumber: The 55th Flower of Spring &…

24 Apr 2012 116
One of the things I love about macro lenses is the surprise when you see the image on your computer. Last year I took pictures of these flowers and was amazed to see how fuzzy the blossoms are! If you look at the flowers from any distance, they appear perfectly smooth! I think they are delicate beauties and finding them on our property made me so happy! This species of wild cucumber grows from Canada to California along the coast and produces small, oval, bitter-tasting cucumbers covered with prickles. The leaves were eaten by Native Americans, though they are bitter too. The flowers are female or male with distinguishing characteristics and both genders can appear on the same plant! If you would like to know more about Western Wild Cucumber, Wiki has a great page here: Western Wild Cucumber (Manroot)

Burr Chervil: the 56th Flower of Spring & Summer!

24 Apr 2012 89
As I'm sure you know by now, I adore tiny blossoms which are just a blur unless your nose is touching them! This itty bitty beauty has little blossoms about 1/16" inch in diameter and the little bouquets that it grows in look only like a blurry little spot that really looks like nothing at all! Yet if you can just get close enough...what beautiful flowers! These grow under the forest canopy under our oak trees, and even in our front yard under the eaves where it's shady for most of the day. When they go to seed, they'll form annoying burrs that cling to anything it touches. I wish it would stay in flower forever because the burrs I cannot stand! This flower is considered to be both an herb and a noxious weed. It is native to Europe and Asia but was introduced to the west coast of the United States and from what I've been reading, it's rapidly spreading all over the country because it adapts so well, and travels so efficiently by way of it's burr-covered seeds. Think about it...when a burr gets stuck to your sock, and you are on a vacation driving across the country, that burr may be pulled off your sock and tossed on the dirt many states from where you picked it up. A very good way to spread everywhere! For more information about this flower, I found a good source with lots of pictures here: Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture: Burr Chervil This image was taken in April, 2012.

Buckbrush: The 57th Flower of Spring & Summer!

13 May 2012 124
Buckbrush and I have a very tense relationship. I have spent hundreds of hours cutting down and piling up these ugly bushes, and our lower forest is covered with dozens of enormous brush piles, made up mostly of buckbrush! The only time I almost don't mind this prickly shrub is when it's springtime, because the flowers it makes are just beautiful! They are very pretty, but of course they wouldn't have a pretty fragrance like a normal flower...instead, they STINK to high heaven and whenever I go outside I have to endure their cloisome, icky odor! It's a horrible plant! If you would like to know more about (STUPID) :D Buckbrush, you can read a short entry on Wiki: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceanothus_cuneatus This image was taken in April, 2012.

Corn Salad: The 58th Flower of Spring & Summer!

24 Apr 2012 122
This beautiful tiny flower grows in clusters in early to mid-Spring. Thy look like little rectangular bouquets which can only be appreciated when your nose is almost touching the flowers! From Wiki: Valerianella locusta is a small dicot annual plant of the family Valerianaceae. It is an edible salad green with a characteristic nutty flavor, dark green color, and soft texture. Common names include corn salad (or cornsalad), lamb's lettuce, mâche, fetticus, feldsalat, nut lettuce, field salad, Nüssli Salat, and rapunzel. In restaurants that feature French cooking, this salad green may be called doucette or raiponce, as an alternative to mâche, by which it is best known.

Tiny Bluet: The 59th Flower of Spring & Summer!

24 Apr 2012 152
This picture is one of my all-time favorites! To me, these flowers seem to be cut from lavender silk with filiment wires forming the pistils and a tiny bit of enamel on the tip of each one, tinted with brown. The size of each blossom is just 1/8" in diameter! I discovered this flower when creeping around in our meadow and nearly stepped on them where they were growing in the shade under our big Oak tree. I can hardly believe how beautiful these blossoms are, they don't seem real! :D I tried to find the exact flower species, but the closest I could get was possibly a Bluet in the Houstonia genus; it looks similar to a Tiny Bluet so until I find a better match, that's what I'll call it! :) I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) NOTE! I have finally updated my profile and I hope you'll take a look to find out a little more about me and how important all of you are to my experience here on Flickr! Janet's profile (sfhipchick) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Fiddleneck: The 60th Flower of Spring & Summer!

24 Apr 2012 1 93
Yesterday I posted a picture of a crab spider on the stem of a Fiddleneck flower. Here is the flower he was on!! :D I love these orange-yellow flowers with their unfurling blossoms, and until we moved here, I had no idea there are so many flower species that unroll like this! We have several types that I can think of: Popcornflowers (about 4 species), Forget-Me-Nots, and these Fiddlenecks! Fiddlenecks get their name from their unfurling appearance, which looks like the head of a fiddle! :) There are 11 species of this flower and they are native to western North America and south-western South America, but are now found in many other areas. They are poisonous to livestock and will cause skin irritations if handled. Some species were once eaten and used for medicinal purposes by Native Americans. If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a great page here: Wiki: Fiddleneck

A Seed Emerges

09 Apr 2012 155
The very first picture I took for my Flower of Spring & Summer set was the impossibly tiny Spring Whitlow Grass. I was so surprised when I saw something weird about one of the flowers and kneeled down to take a nose-close look. Such a smile I made when I saw that a seed was emerging from the fading blossom, looking to me just like a miniature snow pea pod! Can you believe it's just 1/8" long?!!! Talk about tiny!! :D I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) NOTE! I have finally updated my profile and I hope you'll take a look to find out a little more about me and how important all of you are to my experience here on Flickr! Janet's profile (sfhipchick)

Death Camas: the 61st Flower of Spring & Summer!

27 Apr 2012 114
Last year I discovered these flowers growing in our meadow and I was so enchanted by their beauty that I spent time to figure out what they were. Imagine my surprise when I found out their name, "Death Camas"!! How can something so pretty be so dangerous?! I've known for many years that it's always a good idea to look and not touch plants and flowers, but who knew so many flowers are really poisonous?! In fact, I have discovered many species that grow on our property are quite poisonous, and makes me happy I don't have a curious child who likes to chomp on pretty blossoms!! YIKES!! Death Camas is so poisonous that even its scientific name spells it out: "Toxicoscordion venenosum"! All parts of this flower are extremely poisonous, and in fact, it is said that alkaloid present, called zygadenine, is even more poisonous than strychnine!!! Small amounts will make anything eating it vomit, drool, become weak and cause a decrease in blood pressure, your pupils will dialate, and you'll spend hours in the bathroom. Larger amounts can result in seizures, coma, and death. It is suspected that the Lewis and Clark expedition were mistakenly offered bulbs from this plant, instead of the edible blue camas, and soon after eating these bulbs, the whole party became violently ill for weeks! A lesson for all of us: look but do not touch the plants and flowers we photograph!! If you would like to know more about this deadly beauty, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Death Camas (Toxicoscordion venenosum) I found an excellent article here as well: Britannica Blog: Death Camas Toxic Tuesdays.

Birdsfoot Trefoil: The 62nd Flower of Spring!

24 Apr 2012 124
When I first studied this flower on my computer, I thought at first that it was a tiny Sweet Pea because its blossom looks so similar. But...Sweet Peas don't have three-lobed leaves like this does....so, then I thought it was some kind of clover, because its leaves seem just like those we all know as the shamrock. But clover blossoms don't look anything like this! So confusing!! However, after a lot of looking in my books, I finally discovered its identity! It's a species of Trefoil, which means "three-leaved plant"! :D And in fact, it is related to clover, but in a different genus. The tiny Birdsfoot Trefoil is native to Eurasia and North Africa but can be found all over North America, where it has been cultivated as a nutritious food for livestock. It's also an important nectar source for insects and a food source for larval insects. This plant is considered to be an invasive species in both North America and Australia, and here's an interesting fact: this little beauty is tasty for livestock, but it contains cyanogenic glycosides and is poisonous to humans! Finally, this flower is a symbol for revenge or retribution. If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a great source here: Wiki: Birdsfoot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus)

Rogue River Locoweed: The 63rd Flower of Spring &…

24 Apr 2012 150
I think I'm on a poisonous flower kick, because here's the third in a row! This pretty flower gets its nickname (also known as Milkvetch) because of its toxic nature. It grows all over the United States and is an nightmare for lifestock owners. Cattle and other livestock are attracted to this plant and if they eat enough of it over the course of a week or two, they will begin to turn in circles, drool, lose weight, and get a dazed, dull look in their eyes. If owners don't notice, the animals can starve to death or die of heart ailments. Also, affected animals suffer from reproductive problems of many kinds. Yet another flower which is beautiful yet deadly! If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a great source here: Wiki: Locoweed (Astragalus)

English Plantain: The 64th Flower of Spring & Summ…

02 May 2012 163
Even though this flower is considered to be an invasive weed, I've always loved its unusual and interesting shape. What I didn't know was its colorful history! A native plant of Europe, it is now found in most parts of the world and has been found all the way back to the early Neolithic age, about 8,000 years ago! I wonder if that's why it's so odd looking!!! There is evidence that people in what is now Germany gathered "Plantago lanceolata" for a food source for their farm animals. It has been historically known as a medicinal cure-all, even mentioned by Chaucer and Shakespeare! Today, this herbal plant is found to be useful as a cough suppressant and if you look up Ricola , you'll see this herb listed as one of the ingredients they use in their formulas! It's also used in teas and other herbal remedies. Besides its mediciinal uses, Plantains (not related to the banana relative by the same name) are also edible; young leaves and flower heads can be added to salads; the leaves can be substituted for spinach. If you would like to know more about its edible and medicinal uses, there's a great page here: Prairie Land Herbs: Plantain If you would like to know more about the plant in general, Wiki has a source here: Wiki: Plantain (Plantago lanceolata) and here Wiki: Plantago Explored on June 10, 2012, placement at #406

False Dandelion: The 65th Flower of Spring & Summe…

27 Apr 2012 99
Although this flower may look very similar to a dandelion, comparing the two shows this flower to be quite different. It grows quite a bit taller and the buds and flower petals are also different. I think they are really beautiful, especially as a close-up! Because they're taller, I find them to be quite graceful looking and elegant. The False Dandelion is an edible herb which is also considered to be a hated weed and grows anywhere its seeds can sprout. Native to Europe, this flower is now found all over the world. As was mentioned, this plant is completely edible and it's added to salads, steamed or stir-fried. The roots can be roasted and ground for a coffee substitute! It is suspected that if eaten in excess, however, horses can get an leg flexion ailment called "stringhalt" . If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Catsear

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