280/366: 160th Flower of Spring & Summer: Tiny Stalk of Lilies

The Flowers of Spring & Summer!


I have decided to have a counting of each kind of flower that I find on our property this spring and summer! I saw the first flower in early February and it's the smallest flower too! Next I found a little white flower that looks ready for a mouse's wedding bouquet! Number three were the crocus flowers that popped out in one big clump of loveliness! Then I discovered the Henderson Shooting Star, b…  (read more)

Burrowing Clover: The 36th Flower of Spring!

15 Apr 2012 116
When I originally posted this flower, I didn't know exactly what kind of clover it was. I have finally discovered what it is! :D Burrowing Clover, also known as Subterranean Clover, is not native to the United States.

Goldfields: The 37th Flower of Spring!

15 Apr 2012 96
[best appreciated at full size against black] Down in our granite valley, the mushrooms are all gone. The tiny monkeyflowers have been joined by their larger cousin, the Seep-Spring Monkeyflower, and at the same time, the whole area is turning yellow with the addition of an enormous carpet of these sunny Goldfields! Aren't they bright and cheery?! I'll be showing more pictures of how they're covering this part of our meadow, but here's a taste to get you started! :) There are 18 species of Goldfields, 17 of which are native to the western United States, and all 17 can be found in California! I have a dear friend here on Flickr, would you please raise your hand, ALVARO !! The 18th species lives in his beautiful country of CHILE!!! Ok, Alvaro, it's your job to find me the Chilean Goldfield! :D Goldfields an annual herb, and are found in many habitats, especially meadows and vernal pools, but also very dry areas. They flower from February through June depending on the species; ours bloom from March-June or July! :) If you would like to know more about lawn grass, Wiki has a great page here: Wiki: Goldfields (Lasthenia) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Yellow-Tinge Larkspur: The 38th Flower of Spring!

17 Apr 2012 1 128
[best appreciated at full size against black] I've been keeping my eyes open for the color purple, because I was on the look out for THIS flower!! On the way down to the mailbox the other day, I spotted a flash of purple in the woods, and took a detour off the road to take a look. YES!!! Our beautiful Larkspur has arrived!! These flowers are so pretty and exotic looking, it amazes me how many kinds of flowers that grow here! Yellow-Tinge Larkspur is also called Low Larkspur or Coast Delphinium, and is just one of over 300 species in the Delphinium genus! I had a very difficult time figuring out exactly which species I photographed but judging by the yellowish petal edges, I think it's Yellow-Tinge Larkspur. If you find yourself trying to identify plants or animals, you'll discover how difficult it can be to differentiate between one or more very similar species! What a headache! :D Yellow-Tinge Larkspur is native to southern Oregon down to San Francisco, California. It's usually seen along the coast, grasslands, and open forest like on our property. Delphinium is a popular garden flower, but did you know that it is extremely poisonous?! It is deadly to livestock and cattle ranchers will avoid moving herds into rangeland that contains Larkspur until late summer after the flowers have died. However, when carefully prepared in small doses, the seeds are used for herbal medicine , In the past, delphinium flowers were also ground up into a dye or ink, but I suspect this was done before it was understood how poisonous this plant is. If you would like to know more about Delphinium flowers, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Delphinium I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) NOTE! I have finally updated my profile and I hope you'll take a look to find out a little more about me and how important all of you are to my experience here on Flickr! Janet Brien (sfhipchick) This image was taken in April, 2012.

San Francisco Woodland Star: the 39th Flower of Sp…

17 Apr 2012 1 124
In mid-March, I posted the 20th Flower of Spring, the Smallflower Woodland Star. I mentioned that we had another kind that grows on our property, which I had taken older pictures of in May of last year. What fun it was to see a twinkling floral snowflake a couple of weeks ago and run over to smile in joy at one of my favorite flowers! Please say hello to this elegant beauty, the San Francisco Woodland Star! You can see why I adore this flower! It looks just like a snowflake cut from paper and accented with just a tinge of pink! They are stunning, and hundreds are in full bloom all over our lower forests right now! I'm in heaven!! :D This delicate flower can be found from Oregon to Baja, California, where it grows in open forests, mountain- and hillsides and in meadows at the edge of forests. Up to 15 blossoms grow on each stem, which grows from rhizomes to the height of about 2 feet. If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: San Francisco Woodland Star (Lithophragma affine)

Purple Deadnettle: The 40th Flower of Spring!

17 Apr 2012 1 148
*** First Place Winner at the Jackson County Fair! *** The countless varieties of flowers in the world simply amazes me. And yet, right here on my property, there exists an astonishing range in size, color, and shape. Today's flower is one of the weird ones that takes a moment to truly appreciate. When I first saw a Deadnettle a few years ago, I thought that this whole thing was the blossom. It makes sense though, just look at those beautiful, fuzzy, purple and green leaves! What a show!! But the actual flowers are the gorgeous pink and magenta blossoms with their hairy, hot-pink hats! Aren't these flowers amazing?! Growing low to the ground and usually in clusters, Purple Deadnettle--also known as Purple Archangel or Red Henbit--is native to Europe and Asia, but is now found at low elevations in many areas of the United States and is considered an invasive weed. Although it appears similar to nettle, it's neither related nor does it sting; thus its name, " dead nettle". The flowers, stems and leaves of young plants are very nutritious and can be used in salads and stirfrys! :D It has many medicinal uses as well, including an astringent, diuretc, blood coagulant, and laxative, to name just a few! WOW! If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a page here: Deadnettle (Lamium purpureum) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Mysterious Yellow Beauty: The 41st Flower of Sprin…

17 Apr 2012 131
[best appreciated at full size against black] A couple of weeks ago I looked out our downstairs bathroom window and saw something white and round on the ground. "PUFFBALL!!!!" I squealed, and ran out the door with my camera, Tasmanian Devil-style! As I paused between taking pictures, I noticed a tiny yellow blossom right next to me, and turned to take its picture. Little did I know what trouble this flower would be for identification! Since I took this picture, I've been looking everywhere for confirmation of what kind of flower it is. No luck. In desperation, I pulled the last of it out of the ground today to take pictures of the leaves at the base of the plant, since the flowers have long-since died. I'm going to add the leaves to this post once I get them cleaned up. What a mystery!! I can't find any other flowers like it to compare against either. What a head-scratcher!! If you ever try to identify flowers, you will soon learn how hard it is to tell one flower from another...sometimes the differences can only be seen under a microscope! Sheesh. I'm interested in knowing about the subjects I photograph, but there's definitely a point where I draw the line! :D However, needless to say, if you happen to know what kind of flower this is, I'd love to hear from you! I'm thinking it might be a Draba or a Mustard but I just can't be certain, and it might not even be related! This image was taken in April, 2012.

Wild Blue Flax: The 42nd Flower of Spring!

17 Apr 2012 152
I found this darling Wild Blue Flax blossom peeking out from a tuft of grass out in our front lawn area and I was so delighted because I didn't realize they grew this early in the season. I have seen them from June to August, but apparently they begin blooming in April! These delicate beauties are one of my favorites, growing on their long, slender stems. Wild Blue Flax is also known as Prairie Flax, Western Blue Flax, or just Blue Flax for short, is found west of the Mississippi. Its proper name, Linum Lewisii , comes from Meriwether Lewis of the Lewis & Clark Expedition! Blue Flax grows about 2 feet tall in dry meadows and ridge tops, from sea level to 3000 feet. These small flowers measure about 1/2" in diameter when open, and are pale blue or lavender in color, though apparently they can be white as well. These delicately striped flowers last just one day! If you would like to know more about Wild Blue Flax, Wiki has a great page here: Wiki: Wild Blue Flax (Linum lewisii)

Miniature Lupine: The 43rd Flower of Spring!

20 Apr 2012 1 1 119
2 pictures in notes above :D I had totally forgotten that we have a species of Lupine that grows on our property, so when I nearly stepped on this Miniature Lupine, I was so happy to see its leaves reaching up to me like a child wanting to be picked up! :D These darling little flowers pop up all over the lower part of our property and try with great determination to rise above the grass that usually towers over these short plants. Miniature Lupines are also known as Bicolor Lupines because they are deep blue-purple and white (though sometimes the white is light purple). They are native to western North America from British Columbia south to California, and can be found from sea level the high mountains in any kind of soil. Miniature Lupines seem to have several types, though they aren't classified; for instance, the picture on Wiki's page shows a lupine totally different than what I have seen on my property and on Mount Ashland . These flowers are part of the genus, "Lupinus", and includes over 280 species, found in North and South America, Africa and Europe. They are in the legume family, which includes peas and beans! In fact, the seeds or beans of lupines were popularly eaten by Romans, and even today, lupine beans are served in Mediterranean countries as well as Lebanon and in some South American countries too. Lupines are good companion plants for many vegetables that like nitrogen, such as cucumbers, squash, broccoli and spinich. They are slowly becoming recognized as an alternative cash crop to soy beans, and are grown in several countries as livestock feed! And yet, these beans can cause Lupin poisoning and may cause reactions to those allergic to peanuts. If you would like to know more about Miniature Lupines, Wiki has a great page here: Wiki: Miniature Lupine (Lupinus bicolor) For more information about Lupines, Wiki has a great page here: Wiki: Lupine (Lupin) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Lovely Miniature Lupine Blossoms

20 Apr 2012 1 1 117
[best appreciated at full size against black] Two days ago I posted a picture of a budding Miniature Lupine. I had the picture ready so here's what the blossoms look like! Aren't they stunning? Keep in mind, that little blue-purple "slipper" (the lower part) is only about 1/8" long...so tiny and yet, so exquisite! Just another reason I love my macro lens! :) With this image, I wanted to have the right blossom in crisp focus, with the left blossom beginning to fade into the "watercolor bokeh"...I hope you like it! This image was taken in April, 2012.

Pacific Madrone Buds: 44th Flower of Spring!

27 Apr 2012 1 144
[best appreciated at full size against black] While walking along our ridge line, I found some budding madrone blossoms, and I was surprised because I'd never noticed them before! When the time came to work on this picture, I started running into problems. I really liked the depth of field but the colors were all too similar and lacked impact. This is when I start playing with filters to see if an idea comes to mind. I was looking through Topaz Lab's "Lens Effects" suite (highly recommended filters!!!) when I found a Toy filter that changed the image to black and white. BAM! That was it! Suddenly the flowers popped out and the image became dramatic and interesting! If you ever feel like you want to give up on a picture that seems to have some potential, take a walk through your filter library and odds are you'll find something to push you in the right direction! :) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Small-flowered Tonella: The 45th Flower of Spring!

20 Apr 2012 98
Ladies and gentlemen, I would like to introduce you to one of the very smallest, most beautiful little flowers I've ever seen! If you can believe it, this blossom measures only about 1/8" of an inch in length and just 1/16" wide!! Impossibly tiny, I was taking a picture of a tiny flower twice this size when I spotted this blossom twinkling at me. "Seriously??!! It's a FLOWER!!" I was excited to see if I could identify it, and with a bit of searching, I got lucky! YAY! I wasn't at all surprised to find out that it's actually CALLED a "Small Flower"!!! The Small-flowered Tonella is found in protected forest under trees, often Oaks (which this one was!) and is native to western North America from Vancouver Island to southern California at low to mid-elevations. If you would like to know more about Small-flower Tonellas, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Small-flower Tonella (Tonella tenella)

Many-Flowered Bedstraw: The 46th Flower of Spring!

20 Apr 2012 84
[best appreciated at full size against black] Here's another itty bitty flower that's so small it's just SILLY! :D It's nearly the same size as Friday's flower, perhaps 1/8" in diameter. Another flower I nearly didn't see, it was the greenery surrounding the blossom that got my attention before I found the tiny little blossom in the center with its fancy furry collar. If you can believe it, this tiny flower is in the same family as coffee!! It makes seeds that are called "nutlets" which are round and covered with hooked bristles. Often called "Bedstraw" for short, this flower is also known as "Shrubby Bedstraw" or "Kellogg's Bedstraw." It's found in parts of California, Oregon and Nevada, and is a favorite food of butterfly larvae! If you would like to know more about Many-Flowered Bedstraw, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Many-Flowered Bedstraw (Galium multiflorum) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Common Vetch: The 47th Flower of Spring!

20 Apr 2012 101
All over our property, we have these flowers blossoming everywhere right now, and I just love them! For years I thought these were called Wild Sweetpeas until I did some research and realized that a) this is called Common Vetch, and b) we have a close relative which is entirely different (and beautiful), and c) we don't even HAVE Wild Sweetpeas growing here!! :D :D And Wild Sweetpeas aren't even very close relatives...I couldn't have been more incorrect all these years! :D Silly me!! :D I have to say, it's been really great doing this Flowers of Spring project because I'm learning SO MUCH about the plants and flowers here! (animals too!) Common Vetch is considered a weed, but in livestock fields, it's a very nutritious addition to the grass they eat. In fact, this relative of the pea is specifically planted for this very reason, and is known to fatten up cattle better than most grass or other feed. It can actually be too rich and if there's too much vetch growing in a field, animals can get colic and other stomach problems by overeating. In ancient times, humans used to eat vetch, and remains dated back to Neolithic times have shown vetch as part of the diet of the time! The same evidence has been found in ancient Egypt, Rome, and the Bronze Age. Incidentally, just because it's usually only fed to livestock, the tips of new stems and the flowers are said to be quite nice to eat in salads! If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Common Vetch (Vicia sativa) Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :)

Narrow-Leaved Montia: The 48th Flower of Spring!

20 Apr 2012 128
[best appreciated at full size against black] One of the things that makes me crazy is trying to identify certain flowers....this tiny beauty is a perfect example. It looks very similar to Miner's Lettuce, and conveniently, there was a plant growing right next to this flower so I was able to spend time comparing their obvious differences in flower and leaf shapes. (If you've been visiting my stream for a while now, you may remember that I've shown pictures of Miner's Lettuce , and a sub-species that I wasn't able to pinpoint.) After comparing a number of Miner's Lettuce sub-species, I believe this is called Narrow-Leaved Montia, also known as Narrow-Leaved Miner's Lettuce. This flower is considered to be a weed, but it's also one of the plants you can eat! It can be found all over the western North America from British Columbia to California, as well as Utah and areas in southeastern US including Mississippi. It blooms in moist places in early to mid spring, dying when the rains dwindle. If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Narrow-leaved Montia (Montia linearis) Another page I found shows pictures that look just like my flower with helpful information too: Oregon State University: Narrow-leaved Montia I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) NOTE! I have finally updated my profile and I hope you'll take a look to find out a little more about me and how important all of you are to my experience here on Flickr! Janet's profile (sfhipchick) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Swamp Onion: The 49th Flower of Spring!

20 Apr 2012 131
[best appreciated at full size against black] Our property features a few seasonal wet areas: a pond, a busy, well-defined stream which empties into the pond, and a run-off area where the rain percolates from our hillside, through our big meadow, down our granite valley and empties in a nearly flat depression through our lower forest down to the main road. The slabs of rock are covered with a thin covering of dirt and moss, and there many wet-environment flowers flourish until the area dries out in mid May. Right now the area is covered with flowers from the top of our hill all the way down to the road, including millions of these beauties, our little wild onions! (I'll be posting blossom pictures in the next couple of weeks!) Swamp Onions are common in California and the Pacific Northwest, and can be fournd in sunny, wet meadows with well-drained soil...which is exactly where they are found on our property! The bulbs can be eaten, but tend to be fibrous; the flowers are sometimes used as salad garnishes. Swamp onions, like some other plants in the Allium genus (which includes garlic) can be planted in gardens to deter moths and other insects. If you would like to know more about Swamp Onions, Wiki has a page here: Swamp Onion (Allium validum) This image was taken in April, 2012.

Lovely Little Weed: the Cut-Leaved Geranium Blosso…

15 Apr 2012 125
[best appreciated at full size against black] In all the excitement of new flowers to photograph and process, along with all the other cool pictures I've been lucky enough to take, I've sometimes forgotten to post the blossom version when I've first posted a budding flower. Just like the previous flower (Nutall's Toothwort) I neglected to post the blossom for this flower too! Originally posted as a bud to represent the 28th Flower of Spring, this is the radiantely pink Cut-Leaved Geranium, which is only 1/3" in diameter, and smiling up at me from all over our property right now! In case you didn't get a chance to read about this flower when I posted the bud image, here it is again: The Cut-Leaved Geranium was introduced from Europe and has naturalized itself all over the United States. It's found in fields and along roadsides and is considered to be a widespread noxious weed and invasive species. It blooms from March through October and grows quite happily in dry or moist environments. This image was taken in March, 2012.

A Trio of Tiny Beauties: Nutall's Toothwort Blosso…

24 Mar 2012 80
[best appreciated at full size against black] I have always loved tiny flowers because most people don't even see them, and as a child, it delighted me that I could make a beautiful bouquet out of itty-bitty flowers, and if you looked closely, each little flower was every bit as gorgeous as a big flower that people do notice. This is why I see these flowers so easily! I'm drawn to them, and I have always made a point to show them to anyone that will stop and look. I'm that person who will stop at a crack in the sidewalk, bend down, and spend a long moment to appreciate the tiny flower growing there. They're amazing and because of my macro lens and awesome camera, I can share each of my tiny treasures with all of you! :) This is a the stunning Nutall's Toothwort, a flower which measures just 1/4" in diameter. When I found this species in bud and posted it as the 11th Flower of Spring, I didn't know its name. I have since discovered what this flower is called, and now I can tell you a little bit more about it! :) Nuthall's Toothwort is an early spring perennial herb that is native to western North America from British Columbia to California. It can be found in moist environments and is one of four species in the Cardamine genus, all of which grow throughout North America. They are edible, though not well-known in this regard. If you would like to know more about this flower, Wiki has a page here: Wiki: Nuttall's Toothwort (Cardamine nuttallii) I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) NOTE! I have finally updated my profile and I hope you'll take a look to find out a little more about me and how important all of you are to my experience here on Flickr! Janet's Profile (sfhipchick) This image was taken in March, 2012.

I'm A Star!!

06 Apr 2012 84
[best appreciated at full size against black] While looking through my pictures of Smallflower Woodland Stars , I discovered a surprise! This blossom has a perfect star in its center, which I thought was too much fun to pass up! If you didn't get a chance to read my information about this flower, here it is! There are about a dozen species of Woodland Stars and they can be found all over the Western United States. Considered to be an herb, these flowers grow from rhizomes (bulblets) and can be found both in meadows and in deep forests. If you would like more information about these lovely little flowers, I found a nice source with lots of pictures here: Lithophragma: Woodland Stars Wiki has a bit of information here: Smallflower Woodland Star This image was taken in March, 2012.

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