280/366: 160th Flower of Spring & Summer: Tiny Stalk of Lilies

The Flowers of Spring & Summer!


I have decided to have a counting of each kind of flower that I find on our property this spring and summer! I saw the first flower in early February and it's the smallest flower too! Next I found a little white flower that looks ready for a mouse's wedding bouquet! Number three were the crocus flowers that popped out in one big clump of loveliness! Then I discovered the Henderson Shooting Star, b…  (read more)

Birdseye Speedwell: The 10th Flower of Spring!

10 Mar 2012 100
[best appreciated at full size against black] This gorgeous little blue and white flower is one of my favorite tiny wildflowers, and has a diameter of about 1/4". Amazingly, they are considered a weed because they invade lawns...but who would dislike these little jewels?! They are now popping up all over our property and we'll see them through summer if my memory serves me right! :) I've uploaded two other pictures today and I hope you'll visit them too! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :) NOTE! I have finally updated my profile and I hope you'll take a look to find out a little more about me and how important all of you are to my experience here on Flickr! www.flickr.com/people/sfhipchick/ This image was taken in March, 2012.

Nuttall's Toothwort: The 11th Flower of Spring!

10 Mar 2012 137
Have you ever tried to identify the flowers and insects that you photograph? Talk about a time-consuming project!! I used to try to find the flowers and insects online and spent hours searching through pictures, often without luck. Now I have two books, Wildflowers of the Pacific Northwest and Wildflowers of Southern Oregon, and they are very helpful! I still have a difficult time identifying my flowers, but at least I don't have to waste so much time looking online. This little flower was found on a walk along our ridgetop, right where I turn around to go back! What a nice reward! Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :)

Henderson's Fawn Lily: The 12th Flower of Spring!

16 Mar 2012 137
[best appreciated at full size against black] I found this graceful budding flower at the end of the ridgeline hike from our house, and I wanted to show a close up of the bud because I think it's just so beautiful. Everything about this plant is lovely. I'll be showing one of its leaves on a later date--they're gorgeous! And wait until you see this flower in full blossom! I'm happy to find many of these popping up all over our hillside, so there will be many beautiful flowers to take pictures of as they mature! This image was taken in March, 2012.

Henderson's Fawn Lily in Full Bloom

26 Mar 2012 1 203
A couple of weeks ago, I posted a picture of a flower bud that I found up along our ridge line. I didn't know what it was until Steve and I went to the Upper Table Rocks and we found a few in bloom. I waited for ours to begin blooming and yesterday I climbed up to the top of our hill and found countless blossoms growing everywhere! And to realize that Steve and I have been here for over FIVE YEARS and I never knew we had these flowers!! Unbelievable!! I feel very sad that I missed so much beauty for four years but on the other hand, this year I have a very nice camera to take pictures with! :D Henderson's Fawn Lily is part of the genus "Erythronium", which includes 20-30 species which grow from tooth-like bulbs in early to mid-spring. This species only grows in a small area in southwest Oregon and just south into Northern California. However, they are very prolific in their range and hillsides can be totally covered with these beautiful flowers with their equally lovely mottled leaves. If you would like to know more about this lovely flower, Wiki has a great page here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erythronium_hendersonii Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :)

The 13th Flower of Spring!

22 Mar 2012 84
[best appreciated at full size against black] If you've been enjoying my Flowers of Spring show, you'll know that I am taking pictures of flowers as I find them emerging on our property. Sometimes I catch them early enough that they are just buds, like this one. I never know when I'll find the next one, and as it was, I was heading up our hill to the ridge line so I could check on the Henderson's Fawn Lily bud I'd photographed, in hopes that it had opened. However, at the base of the hill, this lovely stranger showed itself to me! I'm so excited because I have no idea what it will look like when it blossoms!! Another Spritngtime present to watch open! This image was taken in March, 2012.

Manzanita Buds: The 14th Flower of Spring!

24 Mar 2012 93
[best appreciated at full size against black] Our property doesn't have many types of trees. The majority are Oaks trees but we also have lots of Manzanitas, some Madrones and Pine trees, a Laurel and an Ash tree. Manzanitas are one of our favorites because of their beautiful bark, pretty leaves and their lovely flowers. These buds will be in full blossom in the next few week, and I can't wait to smell their candy-sweet fragrance! You will love their lovely bell-shaped blossoms! This image was taken in March, 2012.

Manzanita Blossoms

09 Apr 2012 1 1 135
[best appreciated at full size against black] A few weeks ago I posted a picture of Manzanita buds, the 14th Flower of Spring. Here is a grouping of the flowers in full blossom! Aren't they pretty?! :) Manzanita is a flowering shrub which can grow into a tree if given time--it is an extremely slow-growing plant. It can grow in extremely dry terrain, however, and has beautiful, smooth, orange bark to go along with its lovely dusty green oval leaves. There are over 100 species, most of which are endemic to California and neighboring states. The berries and flowers of most species are edible, and are a popular food for birds and squirrels, as well as butterflies, bees, and other insects. The berries were traditionally ground into a meal, and also made into cider! The young leaves can be chewed to quench thirst, and Native Indians used leaves as toothbrushes! If you would like to know more about Manzanitas, Wiki has a great page here: Wiki: Manzanita This image was taken in April, 2012.

Hall's Desert Parsley: The 15th Flower of Spring!

25 Mar 2012 1 1 120
I have to say, it's starting to get crazy around here with the exponetial explosion of plants and flowers taking over our property right now! We're having a nice, rainy spring, and every bit of dirt is now covered with new greenery. It's exciting, but it's also intimidating...I am trying to get out between storms to look for new flowers and I find something new every time I go out !! Today's flower is Hall's Desert Parsley , which I found growing right next to our seasonal pond. There was exactly one plant, but I know there will be many more as the season progresses. I see these growing through summer, but here is the first one! :D There are many species of Desert Parsley all over the U.S. and it's classified as an herb. This plant, which smells similar to parsley, is edible--both the leaves and starchy root--and is a traditional food of Native Americans. One species is used as an herbal medicine for coughs and upper respiratory infections, including tuberculosis! If you would like to know more about this flower, here's a good source of information: www.pnwflowers.com/flower/lomatium-hallii If you would like to know more about the genus "Lomatium", Wiki has a concise page of information here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lomatium Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :)

Chickweed Monkeyflower: The 16th Flower of Spring!

24 Mar 2012 90
[best appreciated at full size against black] Every year at this time, the moss and grass-covered area around our granite valley begins to take on color. At first, there are the twinkling white Spring Whitlow Grass and Spring Sandwort flowers to ring in the season. Then, as of about a week ago, a flash of yellow can be seen here and there, which will soon erupt into a carpet of tiny yellow flowers that resemble tiny orchids to me! The Chickweed Monkeyflower has begun to bloom!! YAY!! I was very excited to see these tiny jewels begin to appear, and I had a very hard time taking pictures of them last year. This bud represents my first attempt at photographing this tiny flower bud, which measures about 1/3" in length and about 1/8" in diameter unopened. The Chickweed Monkeyflower is in the genus "Mimulus," includes about 150 species and can be found world-wide. They get their name from the resemblance of some species to a monkey's face. This species is found in places where the ground is very wet, and are only found here on our property. Rain water runs down off of our hillside, through the meadow and down through the valley below, making this area almost bog-like during sprintime. I was interested to find out that monkeyflowers accumulate salt in their leaves and stems, and were used as a salt substitute to flavor wild game by Native Americans and pioneers. It also has medicinal uses; the juice squeezed from the plant's foliage has been used as a soothing poultice for minor burns and skin irritations. If you would like to know more about monkeyflowers, Wiki has a great source of information here: Wiki: Monkeyflower (Mimulus) . This image was taken in March, 2012.

Chickweed Monkeyflower Blossom

06 Apr 2012 141
[best appreciated at full size against black] A couple of weeks ago, I posted a pictured of a very tiny Chickweed Monkeyflower bud, just about to open. Here it is, arms open wide and face to the sun. This tiny little flower measures only about 1/4" across and is one of the very smallest monkey flower species! I think they are so beautiful, and yet, their size, bright color and my inexperience made it impossible for me to take a good picture with my Canon SX30 last year! Yay for having a better camera!! I'm so pleased with this image and I hope you like it too! The Chickweed Monkeyflower is in the genus "Mimulus," includes about 150 species and can be found world-wide. They get their name from the resemblance of some species to a monkey's face. This species is found in places where the ground is very wet, and are only found here on our property. Rain water runs down off of our hillside, through the meadow and down through the valley below, making this area almost bog-like during sprintime. I was interested to find out that monkeyflowers accumulate salt in their leaves and stems, and were used as a salt substitute to flavor wild game by Native Americans and pioneers. It also has medicinal uses; the juice squeezed from the plant's foliage has been used as a soothing poultice for minor burns and skin irritations. If you would like to know more about monkeyflowers, Wiki has a great source of information here: Wiki: Monkeyflower (Mimulus) . This image was taken in April, 2012.

Great Hound's Tongue: The 17th Flower of Spring!

26 Mar 2012 116
What an exciting find!! One of my many favorite flowers on our property is the Great Hound's Tongue, which can be found popping up all over around our lower and upper forest. I've been looking for signs of this flower every time I go out, and about a week or so ago, I began seeing leaves pop up from bulbs that I was pretty sure were Hound's Tongues. Then, three days ago when I took the dogs up to the ridge line, I found one with buds just about to open!! HOORAY!! I'm having a lot of fun taking pictures of flower buds to show before the blossom because both are very pretty and it's neat to see the difference in appearance. Great Hound's Tongue gets its name for the leave's resemblance to a dog's tongue. (They are very beautiful too, and I'll be showing a picture in the next week or so.) These flowers are found in oak or pine forests at lower and middle elevations, from British Columbia down to southern California. It is known to be poisonous and grazing animals will become photo-sensitive if they eat it. Farmers consider it a noxious weed because the burrs it produces stick to sheep's wool and is difficult to remove. If you would like to know more about this lovely flower, there is an nice page here: The Hound's Tongues of the Columbia River Gorge of Oregon and Washington . Wikipedia also has a good source of information here: Wiki: Cynoglossum Grande . Thanks to all of you who have visited and have left comments and favorites! I try to go to all of your pages within a day or two and is a highlight for me to see your beautiful photography! :)

Droplet-Covered Yellow Daffodil: The 18th Flower o…

28 Mar 2012 94
Before Steve and I moved to this beautiful property, previous owners planted several kinds of daffodil bulbs. I've appreciated them in the past, but this year I was waiting for them to hurry up and bloom! You know the saying, "A watched pot never boils?" Well, this applies to flowers too! However, at last the flowrs are all opening up and putting on a glorious show!! It looks like we'll have four kinds of daffodils, including the jonquils, which are opening too!! The first flower was cream with a lemon center, and this one is all yellow! I think these flowers are just spectacular looking! These are so pretty that I've decided to purchase more bulbs in the fall so we can have even more kinds next spring! :D

Dramatic Jonquil Buds: The 19th Flower of Spring!

28 Mar 2012 6 2 190
Yesterday I posted a picture of our lovely yellow daffodils and today, for a change, jonquil buds in black and white! I had trouble with the background when this was in color...I was about to make the decision to retake the shot when I decided to see what would happen if I changed it to a b/w image. WOW! The contrast problems I was having went away and suddenly, the cool shadows on the jonquils really popped out! Once I figured out that b/w was the way to go, I reverted to the color version and carefully adjusted the contrast of the shadows, midtones and highlights before changing it to a b/w image. I have found that doing most of my adjustments to the color version is the better way to go because you have a lot more information to work with. If you're unsure about this process, remember that making adjustments in the color version will make it look "wrong"...you want to increase the contrast carefully, by enhancing the darks and lights and watching the midtones so they don't lose detail on the switch to b/w. Once you're satisfied, final adjustments can then be made in the grayscale version. It's really fun to do this, especially when you understand that most color images will not look good in b/w without these adjustments. I hope I did a good job with this one!! I'm no pro at b/w but I am happy how this one turned out! :) NOTE: I meant to upload the opened cream and yellow daffodil and I forgot! :D :D It will be up to see tomorrow for sure! :D

Jonquil Face After A Spring Shower [Flickr Explore…

31 Mar 2012 3 189
A week or so ago, I posted a black and white image of a cluster of our jonquils growing in our front yard. Here is an open blossom, just after a Spring rain! :) This image was taken in March, 2012. Explored on April 8th, 2012.

Heart of a Jonquil

31 Mar 2012 2 1 134
Our amazing display of daffodils and jonquils was so pretty that I found myself taking endless pictures of them! Who can resist such perfect flowers?! Here is a close-up of a jonquil's beautiful face right after a spring shower!

Smallflower Woodland Star: The 20th Flower of Spri…

17 Mar 2012 1 131
[best appreciated at full size against black] I'm cheating just a bit with this picture! I took this image at the top of the Upper Table Rock, but I found this beautiful flower popping up all around our granite valley about a week ago! I've taken a bunch of pictures but I'm not happy with them, so I thought it would be ok to post this one instead! :) What's really cool is that I've never seen this species on our property before! We have a different one, called the San Francisco Woodland Star, that shows its pretty face in May. It's much taller (these stand only about 5-8" tall), the flower is larger with a blossom shaped more like a snowflake then these tendril-like petals. There are about a dozen species of Woodland Stars and they can be found all over the Western United States. Considered to be an herb, these flowers grow from rhizomes (bulblets) and can be found both in meadows and in deep forests. If you would like more information about these lovely little flowers, I found a nice source with lots of pictures here: Lithophragma: Woodland Stars Wiki has a bit of information here: Smallflower Woodland Star This image was taken in March, 2012.

Ceylon Daffodil: The 21st Flower of Spring!

01 Apr 2012 1 1 164
[best appreciated at full size against black] Another daffodil I hope you're not sick of them!!! I discovered that this one is called "Ceylon" and is very popular for its color, long lasting blooms, and hardiness. I think it's a jaw-dropping beauty! As you can see, this is a studio shot! Why? Well, I noticed a few days ago that this flower had opened up but was leaning more and more closely to the ground and couldn't hold itself up because water runs down our hill and pools in our yard where this daffodil was growing. I thought I could help by propping it up with a rock. Then the wind came up but I didn't think about it until the next day, when I saw this flower face down in the water. "OH NO!!!" I yelled and ran over to stand it up again. I looked at the stem and to my sorrow, it was broken near the ground and only attached by a few fibers. It was essentially dead so I gently pulled it free and brought it into the house. Rinsed off and put into a vase, it's now filling the house with a lovely perfume and is quite the fetching model, as you can see! I took a bunch of low-key pictures, and then my husband took a bunch as well. This lovely flower may be dead, but it will never be forgotten! I hope that my picture does this flower justice! :) If you would like to know more about Ceylon Daffodils, I found information here: Ceylon Daffodils For more information about all daffodils, Wiki has a very complete source here: Narcissus Did you want to see pictures of many kinds of daffodils? I found this company with gorgeous images here: Daffodil Depot This image was taken in March, 2012.

Oregon Fawn Lily: The 22nd Flower of Spring!

02 Apr 2012 2 2 175
I seem to find a lot of wonderful discoveries along the ridge line that runs from our property, through our neighbor's property, and onto public "BLM" (Bureau of Land Management) land. Nobody ever goes there, as the ridge is steep and there are only a few houses in the area. This suits me just fine as I wouldn't want to run into another person alone! I often take the dogs, who think this is the best walk on the planet! On this day, we went to the end of the trail as usual, which is about a mile from our house, and on the way back, I looked down and gasped in surprise. A CREAM-COLORED FAWN LILY growing right in the middle of the trail! OMG!!! Moosie and Zoe were thundering all around so quickly urged them away from the flower and we headed back. It was too late to return with my camera so the next morning I returned to the spot...and...it wasn't there!! OH NO!!! I looked very carefully all the way to the end of the trail and then walked back even slower, looking carefully as I went. Suddenly, there it was, dazzling in the early afternoon sun! What a prize! Oregon Fawn Lilies are in the genus, "Erythronium", which includes the beautiful "Henderson's Fawn Lily" that I posted a week or so ago. There are 20-30 species in this beautiful group of perennial plants, and they grow from tooth-like bulbs in forests and meadows throughout the Northern Hemisphere. I was amazed to find that you can purchase bulbs for sale of this species and many others!! Far Reaches Farm: Oregon Fawn Lily For more information about the Erythronium family, Wiki has a concise directory here: Wiki: Erythronium If you would like to know more about this flower, there's a nice source of information here: Oregon Fawn Lily .Here is another very nice page: Oregon Fawn Lily

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