See also...

3+ Faves 3+ Faves



Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

394 visits

The Antikythera mechanism

The Antikythera mechanism
The Antikythera mechanism is an ancient mechanical calculator (also described as the first known mechanical computer designed to calculate astronomical positions. It was recovered in 1901 from the Antikythera wreck but its complexity and significance were not understood until decades later. It is now thought to have been built about 150–100 BC. Technological artifacts of similar complexity did not reappear until a thousand years later.

The National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Emitron, Rosy, Adam * have particularly liked this photo


Comments
 Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos club
About Easter of 1900, near the island of Antikythera, sponge-fishers from Symi located by charge a very important ancient shipwreck. They were on their way from a voyage to the north coast of Africa and attempted to anchor on the east coast of the island, near the harbour of Potamos. The wrack was a mere 25 metres from the coast, at a dephth of about 50 metres. The work of raising it began at the end of the same year under difficult conditons and lasted for many months.
The objects retrieved from the shipwrack were Greek treasures from various sites. They comprised the cargo of a ship that was sailing probably from Delos or from a city of the Asia Minor coast to Italy, when it was driven off course in extreme bad weather and foundered in the sea.
10 years ago. Edited 10 years ago.
 Adam *
Adam * club
Most interesting.
10 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos club has replied to Adam * club
ΤΗΧ Adam * !!!
10 years ago.
 Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos club
Jacques-Yves Cousteau visited the wreck for the last time in 1978, but found no more remains of the Antikythera Mechanism. Professor Michael Edmunds of Cardiff University who led the most recent study of the mechanism said: "This device is just extraordinary, the only thing of its kind. The design is beautiful, the astronomy is exactly right. The way the mechanics are designed just makes your jaw drop. Whoever has done this has done it extremely carefully...in terms of historic and scarcity value, I have to regard this mechanism as being more valuable than the Mona Lisa".
10 years ago.

Sign-in to write a comment.