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Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
Easter eggs, also called Paschal eggs, are decorated eggs that are often given to celebrate Easter or springtime. As such, Easter eggs are common during the season of Eastertide (Easter season). The oldest tradition is to use dyed and painted chicken eggs, but a modern custom is to substitute chocolate eggs, or plastic eggs filled with confectionery such as chocolate. Eggs are "synonymous with fertility symbols such as the Easter Rabbit" and themes of birth and rebirth. The use of eggs in relation to the springtime festival was linked by Jacob Grimm to the worship of Eostre, the pagan goddess for whom Easter is named.
In Christianity eggs are widely used as part of the celebration of Easter, with varying symbolism attributed to them, including eggs as the empty tomb of Jesus, or dying eggs red to represent the blood of Jesus.
2 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
The practice of decorating eggshells as part of spring rituals is ancient, with decorated, engraved ostrich eggs found in Africa which are 60,000 years old.
In the pre-dynastic period of Egypt and the early cultures of Mesopotamia and Crete, eggs were associated with death and rebirth, as well as with kingship, with decorated ostrich eggs, and representations of ostrich eggs in gold and silver, were commonly placed in graves of the ancient Sumerians and Egyptians as early as 5,000 years ago.
These cultural relationships have strongly influenced early Christian cultures in those areas, as well as through mercantile, religious, and political links from those areas around the Mediterranean. Part of this influence is reflected in some sources attributing the Christian custom of Easter eggs to Christians in Mesopotamia, with the red colour they used being attributed to symbolism of the blood of Christ.
The Christian Church officially adopted the custom, regarding the eggs as a symbol of the resurrection of Jesus. The Roman Ritual, the first edition of which was published in 1610 but which contains texts of much older date, has among the Easter Blessings of Food one for eggs, along with those for lamb, bread, and new produce. The blessing is for consumption as a food, rather than decorated.
The use of eggs has been linked to the pagan goddess Eostre, described by Bede, and in particular Jacob Grimm draws this link in the second volume of Deutsche Mythologie.
2 years ago.
* Didier 85 *
* Didier 85 *
Ha c'est intéressant !
2 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos has replied to * Didier 85 *
,-)
2 years ago.