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Nestorbecher (Coppa di Nestore)

Nestorbecher (Coppa di Nestore)
The so-called Nestor's clay drinking cup from Pithekoussai, Ischia, Italy. (ca. 750 BC)

Armando Taborda has particularly liked this photo


7 comments - The latest ones
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
Den berühmtesten Fund von Pithekoussai stellt sicherlich der sogenannte Nestorbecher dar. Es handelt sich um einen Import aus Rhodos, der in einem aus dem Ende des 8. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. stammenden reichen Grab eines ungefähr zehnjährigen Jungen entdeckt wurde. Was diesen Becher so interessant macht, ist eine darauf eingeritzte dreizeilige Inschrift:

„Nestor besaß eine höchst trinkwürdige Schale, aber jeder, der aus der meinen trinkt, wird sogleich von Verlangen nach der schöngekrönten Aphrodite befallen werden.“
2 years ago.
Armando Taborda
Armando Taborda
very interesting, Demetrius!
2 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos has replied to Armando Taborda
Thank you very much Armando !!
2 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
The inscription is fragmented, as some shards of the cup are lost. It is written in the early Euboean form of the Western Greek alphabet, written from right to left in three separate lines. The text runs:

ΝΕΣΤΟΡΟΣ:...:ΕΥΠΟΤΟΝ:ΠΟΤΕΡΙΟ[Ν]
ΗΟΣΔΑΤΟΔΕΠ[ΙΕ]ΣΙ:ΠΟΤΕΡΙ..:AΥΤΙΚΑΚΕΝΟΝ
ΗΙΜΕΡ[ΟΣ ΗΑΙΡ]ΕΣΕΙ:ΚΑΛΛΙΣΤ[ΕΦΑΝ]Ο:ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΕΣ
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
Νέστορος [εἰμὶ] εὔποτ[ον] ποτήριο[ν]·
ὃς δ’ ἂν τοῦδε π[ίησι] ποτηρί[ου] αὐτίκα κῆνον
ἵμερ[ος αἱρ]ήσει καλλιστ[εφάν]ου Ἀφροδίτης.

Nestor’s cup I am, good to drink from.
Whoever drinks from this cup, him straightaway
the desire of beautiful-crowned Aphrodite will seize.
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
The so-called Cup of Nestor from Pithekoussai is a clay drinking cup (kotyle) that was found by Giorgio Buchner in 1954 at excavations in a grave in the ancient Greek site of Pithekoussai on the island of Ischia in Italy. Pithekoussai was one of the earliest Greek colonies in the West. The cup is dated to the Geometric Period (c.750-700 BC) and is believed to have been originally manufactured in Rhodes. It is now kept in the Villa Arbusto museum in the village of Lacco Ameno on the island of Ischia, Italy.
The cup bears a three-line inscription that was scratched on its side at a later time, and it was later used as a burial gift for a young boy. The inscription is now famous as being one of the oldest known examples of writing in the Greek alphabet, side by side with the so-called Dipylon inscription from Athens. Both inscriptions are dated to c.740-720 BC and have been linked to early writing in the island of Euboea.
2 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
The first Greeks to write were the Minoans, perhaps as early as 1900 BC. They used a hieroglyphic-like, and largely undeciphered, script called Linear A. Sometime around 1400 BC the Minoans were conquered by the Mycenaeans, who adopted the script and modified it into Linear B. Linear B appears to have been used strictly for administrative purposes, possibly by scribes serving the royal palaces. The Mycenaeans, in turn, were defeated by the Dorians, or the mysterious Sea Peoples around 1100 BC. Under the Dorian (or Sea People) rule all vestiges of Mycenaen culture were lost, including writing, and for the next several centuries the Greeks entered a Dark Age.
As legend has it, writing again appeared in Greece through Cadmus: Phoenician prince, dragon-slayer, founder of Thebes, son of Agenor and brother of Phoenix, Cilix and Europa. According to Herodotus, again from his Histories (V 58), Cadmus introduced Phoenician, phoinikeia grammata (φοινικήια γράμματα, Phoenician letters), to the Greeks. Exactly when (or how) this occurred is the subject of some debate, but by 750 BC there were numerous examples of this Phoenician derived Greek alphabet.
Greek, however, is a very different from Semitic Phoenician, so the Greeks used some of the unused Phoenician letters as vowels (the Phoenician aleph became the Greek alpha, e.g.), and created the first true alphabet. The script rapidly spread throughout the Greek city-states, with each different region developing their own version of the letters based on their particular dialect. To further complicate matters the direction of writing changed several times. Initially it was right-to left, like Phoenician, then changed to boustrophedon (βουστροφηδόν "ox-turning"), where each line, and the letters themselves, were written in alternating directions, and, finally, around the fifth century BC, from left to right.
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.