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Utah Beach, Normandie, France, D-Day, 6th June 1944

Utah Beach, Normandie, France, D-Day, 6th June 1944
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Armando Taborda, Kaunos, woelfi, Claudine Gaulier-Denis have particularly liked this photo


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Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
Utah Beach was the code name for the right flank, or westernmost, of the Allied landing beaches during the D-Day invasion of Normandy, as part of Operation Overlord on 6 June 1944. Utah was added to the invasion plan toward the end of the planning stages, when more landing craft became available.
Utah Beach, about 3 miles (5 km) long, was the westernmost of the five landing beaches, located between the villages of Pouppeville and La Madeleine, which became the right flank anchor of the Allied offensive along the left bank (western bank) of the Douve River estuary. The German sector code was W5.
Despite being substantially off course, the US 4th Infantry Division (part of VII Corps) landed with relatively little resistance, in stark contrast to Omaha Beach, where the fighting was fierce.
3 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
By the end of D-Day, some 23,250 troops had safely landed on the beach, along with 1,700 vehicles. Only about 200 casualties were recorded during the landings. Several factors contributed to the success at Utah compared to the bloody battle at nearby Omaha:
Fewer German fortifications: The defense of the area was largely based on flooding the coastal plain behind the beaches, and there were fewer bunkers.
Effective pre-invasion bombardment: Many of the known large bunkers, such as the coastal battery near Saint-Martin-de-Varreville, were destroyed from the air prior to D-Day. B-26 Marauder medium bombers of the US Ninth Air Force, flying below 5,000 feet (1,500 m), provided close air support for the assaulting forces.
DD tanks: Nearly all of these swimming tanks made the beach, because they were launched half as far out as at Omaha and were able to steer into the current more effectively to avoid swamping in the rough seas.
Mis-landings: Because most of the invasion force landed opposite Exit 2, this one was the most used; other exits were more heavily fortified.
Paratroopers: The most significant difference was the 13,000 men from the 101st Airborne Division and the 82nd Airborne Division already fighting inland. For five hours before the first Utah landings, the paratroopers (and glider forces) had been fighting their way toward the beach, clearing the enemy from positions along the exits. The paratroopers also greatly confused the enemy and prevented any significant counterattack to the landing area.
The true cost of Utah Beach is reflected in the heavy airborne casualties: The 101st alone lost less than 20% of its forces on D-Day.[citation needed] Also, the 1,000 casualties during Exercise Tiger, a practice run for the Utah assault, could also be considered part of the price for D-Day.
3 years ago.
Kaunos
Kaunos
Eine gute Kollage.
3 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos has replied to Kaunos
Danke Kaunos !!
3 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
Ici Londres... Clarisse a les yeux bleus, nous disons, Clarisse a les yeux bleus.
3 years ago.
Armando Taborda
Armando Taborda
great reminder, Demetrius!
3 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos has replied to Armando Taborda
Thank you Armando ! Greetings !!!
3 years ago.