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MERIDA MTB Big Nine TFS 300 team 2013, matt-schwarz, 29"

MERIDA MTB Big Nine TFS 300 team 2013, matt-schwarz, 29"
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Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
A tire with a tread width of less than 2.0 in (51 mm) in width is sometimes considered a cyclocross tire by 29" enthusiasts, even though in cyclocross any tire wider than 1.5 in (38 mm) is not a cyclocross tire. Although they are both intended for off road use, and typically use a 622 mm rim, cyclocross bikes and 29" wheeled MTBs differ in their basic handling and geometry, construction methods, durability, and intended lifespan. Bikes exist that blur the distinction by combining attributes of both, however. One example of this is a Monstercross bike, often using a standard mountain bike frame intended for use with 26" wheels with 700c wheels and 700 x 38c-45c tires, disc or cantilever brakes, MTB or cross gearing, and the drop bars of a cyclocross bike.
4 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
The advantages and disadvantages of 29ers are often debated in the mountain bike community. Those who believe the 29" wheel to be inferior often mention added weight, perceived sluggishness in handling, and problems with fit (specifically, front wheel/toe overlap and high standover height). Twenty-niner enthusiasts respond with comments about reduced rolling resistance, perceived increased stability without sacrificing quick handling, and an enhanced ability to roll over obstacles.
One item that is often raised is tire contact patch size and shape. All else being equal, such as tire width, rim width, inflation pressure and rider weight, the contact patch of a 29" wheel has the same area and is slightly longer (~5%) than that of a 26" wheel.
4 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
Larger wheels roll over obstacles more easily. The ability of a wheel to roll over obstacles is proportional to its size. A 29" wheel, which is about 10% larger than a 26" wheel, can roll over 10% larger obstacles. This effect size is largely insignificant. Consequently this benefit has not promoted other industries to consider larger wheel sizes. For instance, off road motor cycles still use 19" wheels.
The larger diameter wheels have more angular momentum so they lose less speed to obstacles and rough sections but the same effect can be achieved with larger tires.
29" bikes tend to offer taller riders a more "natural" frame geometry.
Most of these claims have yet to be objectively investigated. Small scale, unpublished studies (including one done by Pepperdine University, reportedly at the request of Gary Fisher) exist but both proponents and detractors of 29" wheels are generally unimpressed with their scientific rigor. Long debates over how to conduct a "fair" test of the efficiency of 29" vs 26" mountain bikes have raged online, but no serious efforts have been made to conduct a large-scale, scientific study.
Increased wheel size, to keep an identical geometry stack size, results in reduced suspension travel. Each millimeter added to the wheel size needs to be deducted from the travel. Many 29er bike producers try to minimize this effect by allowing stack size to grow. The same approach would allow 26ers to have even more travel.
4 years ago.