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A wooden Santa Fe Railroad caboose at the end of a train

A wooden Santa Fe Railroad caboose at the end of a train
H0 Scale, Fleischmann Bobber Caboose 1434, (Güterzug-Begleitwagen)
in Produktion 1960 - 1972.
Mit rotem oder schwarzem Dach und verschiedenen Aufdrucken.
U.a. Pennsylvania, ATSF, Burlington Route, 2109, 86033.

© MMXIII

8 comments - The latest ones
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
A caboose is a manned American rail transport vehicle coupled at the end of a freight train.
Cabooses were once used on nearly every freight train. Until the 1980s, laws in the United States and Canada required all freight trains to have a caboose and a full crew, for safety. Technology eventually advanced such that the railroads, in an effort to save money and reduce crew members, stated that a caboose was unnecessary and their use has since declined; they are seldom seen on trains, except on locals and smaller railroads.
4 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
The first written evidence of the usage of "caboose" in a railroad context appeared in 1859 (not 1861, as cited by the Online Etymology Dictionary), as part of court records in conjunction with a lawsuit filed against the New York and Harlem Railway.
This suggests "caboose" was probably in circulation among North American railroaders well before the mid-19th century.
Railroad historian David L. Joslyn (a retired Southern Pacific Railroad draftsman) has connected "caboose" to kabhuis, a Middle Dutch word referring to the compartment on a sailing ship's main deck in which meals were prepared. Kabhuis is believed to have entered the Dutch language circa 1747 as a derivation of the obsolete Low German word Kabhuse, which also described a cabin erected on a ship's main deck. However, further research indicates this relationship was more indirect than that described by Joslyn.
Eighteenth century French naval records make reference to a cambose or camboose, which described the food preparation cabin on a ship's main deck, as well as the range within. The latter sense apparently entered American naval terminology around time of the construction of the USS Constitution, whose wood-burning food preparation stove is officially referred to as the camboose. These nautical usages are now obsolete: camboose and kabhuis became the galley when meal preparation was moved below deck, camboose, the stove, became the galley range, and kabhuis the cookshack morphed into kombuis, which means kitchen in Afrikaans and Dutch.
4 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
If there is no Fleischmann in heaven, I won´t go.....
4 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos
Demetrius Chryssikos
HO or H0 is the most popular scale of model railway in the world.
According to the NMRA standard S-1.2 predominantly used in North America, in HO scale, 3.5 mm (0.1378 in) represents 1 real foot (304.8 mm); this ratio works out to about 1:87.1. According to the MOROP standard NEM 010 predominantly used in Europe, the scale is exactly 1:87. In HO, rails are usually spaced 16.5 mm (0.64961 in) apart which models the standard railroad gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in).
The name HO is derived from the fact that its 1:87 scale is approximately half that of O scale which was the smallest of the series of older and larger 0, 1, 2 and 3 scales introduced by Märklin around 1900. In most English-speaking markets it is pronounced "aitch-oh" and written with the letters HO today, but in German it is pronounced "hah-null", and still written with the letter H and numeral 0.
4 years ago.
Erik Baas
Erik Baas
That's because the name _is_ H0, not HO. PS.: This is not a Märklin car, please remove that tag. Thank you.
4 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos has replied to Erik Baas
HO or H0 makes no difference and the wagon is a Fleischmann production, not a Märklin.
4 years ago.
Erik Baas
Erik Baas
It does: "HO" is what we say to a horse when we want it to stop. 1:87 is called "H0". And, again: please remove the "Märklin"-tag. Thank you.
4 years ago.
Demetrius Chryssikos has replied to Erik Baas
Probably in US but not in Europa. Fleischmann, Märklin, Roco (Austria) are manufacturers of model railway products since decenies.
4 years ago.