East front Dunrobin Castle and Gardens 15th May 2006 spot the bench it`s the white one on the right of the picture

Scottish Highlands


East front Dunrobin Castle and Gardens 15th May 20…

15 May 2006 10 16 180
Dunrobin Castle is a stately home in Sutherland, in the Highland area of Scotland, and the family seat of the Earl of Sutherland and the Clan Sutherland. It is located 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Golspie, and approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Brora, overlooking the Dornoch Firth. Dunrobin's origins lie in the Middle Ages, but most of the present building and the gardens were added by Sir Charles Barry between 1835 and 1850. Some of the original building is visible in the interior courtyard, despite a number of expansions and alterations that made it the largest house in the north of Scotland. After being used as a boarding school for seven years, it is now open to the public.

Cawdor Castle 18th May 2006

18 May 2006 1 2 141
CCawdor Castle is set amid gardens in the parish of Cawdor in Nairnshire, Scotland. The castle is built around a 15th-century tower house, with substantial additions in later centuries. Originally a property of the Calder family, it passed to the Campbells in the 16th century. It remains in Campbell ownership, and is now home to the Dowager Countess Cawdor, stepmother of Colin Campbell, 7th Earl Cawdor. The castle is perhaps best known for its literary connection to William Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth, in which the title character is made "Thane of Cawdor". However, the story is highly fictionalised, and the castle itself, which is never directly referred to in Macbeth, was built many years after the life of the 11th-century King Macbeth. The castle is a category A listed building, and the grounds are included in the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland, the national listing of significant gardens.

Sunset from The Esplanade at Oban

Primrose (Primula vulgaris),Letterewe 21st May 200…

Sunset from Rudha Reidh Light Ross-shire Scotland

08 Feb 2009 2 6 161
Sunset from Rudha Reidh Light Ross-shire Scotland

Rhododendron at Letterewe House 22nd May 2005

Rhododendron at Letterewe 22nd May 2005

Sgorr na Ciche & Sgorr nam Fiannaidh across Loch L…

End of the Day Gairloch,Ross-shire,Scotland

24 Nov 2016 2 2 180
End of the Day Gairloch,Ross-shire

Jim & Steve on The Creag Megaidh Range 19th May 19…

Jim & Steve at summit of Carn Eige, Affric Ridge 1…

Steve & Jim at the summit of Sgurr na Lapaich 14th…

Steve & Jim at The Alt na Faing Glen Affric Sgurr…

Jim & Steve looking back at The Lost Valley.Glen C…

21 May 1994 1 6 237
Coire Gabhail (Corrie of the Bounty, or The Hollow of Capture is a high level glen in the Bidean nam Bian mountain massif to the south of Glen Coe, Highland, Scotland. Its narrow entrance 230 metres (750 ft) up the hillside conceals the width of the glen beyond, and it is commonly known as the Hidden Valley or Lost Valley of Glencoe. Access from a bridge crossing the River Coe is by a steep path up beside a narrow wooded ravine. The valley of Coire Gabhail runs southwestwards between the steeply-sided ridges of two of "The Three Sisters"; on its left, Beinn Fhada (Long Hill) is the eastmost sister, and the central sister Gearr Aonach (Short Ridge) on the right of the valley forms its western side. Further to the west of Gearr Aonach, Coire nan Lochan is enclosed by Aonach Dubh (Black Ridge). The southern end of Coire Gabhail is marked by the peak of Stob Coire Sgreamhach on the ridge which then slopes down westwards to its low point at Bealach Dearg, then continues up above cliffs to the summit of Bidean nam Bian. his corrie was formed as a glacial cirque, where a landslip blocked the valley entrance and formed a loch, which gradually silted up. The water of the loch was subsequently drained by a stream finding an underground route through the massive rocks deposited by the landslip, leaving a wide flat alluvial area which now forms the floor of the glen. The name Coire Gabhail (Corrie of the Bounty, or The Hollow of Capture) refers to former times when the valley was used by members of Clan Macdonald to hide cattle and other livestock, whether their own or stolen from others. Like other clans in the area, cattle were the mainstay of their economy, both herding and raiding: young men boastfully sang of getting cows from the Mearns. The wide flat glen is well suited for this purpose since from Glen Coe it appears to be a normal v-shaped glen approached only by a steep narrow gorge. The Macdonalds commonly had feuds with Clan Campbell. This culminated tragically in the 1692 massacre of Glencoe when Campbell soldiers turned on Macdonald clansfolk who fled in a winter blizzard, and a number made their way up to Coire Gabhail while their houses were burned. Those that survived the night then left Glen Coe, fearing the return of the soldiers.

Steve (I`m not comming this way again) Drury on Th…

Steve takes a look back at the view while climbing…

Steve & Jim on summit of The Pap of Glen Coe 3rd M…

Steve at Summit Trig Post Ben Nevis 1st May 1990


314 items in total