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Cornwall
West Penwith
Mên Scryfa standing stone / menhir
Morvah Parish


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Standing stones

Mên Scryfa, Cornish menhir.

Mên Scryfa, Cornish menhir. 

Of unknown age but likely to be Bronze Age 2,400-800 BC.
The jagged tops of Carn Galva can be seen on the horizon.

micritter, Gudrun, Rosalyn Hilborne, Frans Schols and 15 other people have particularly liked this photo


14 comments - The latest ones
 Jean
Jean club
I'm always fascinated with standing stones and how many of them have survived into the present.
18 months ago.
Andy Rodker club has replied to Jean club
Many didn't surbive, Jenny. Well, of course it's hard to destroy a menhir, but many went to form gate post, buildings blocks in farm buildings etc.
17 months ago.
 Andy Rodker
Andy Rodker club
Roger,
Jean,
Larry,
Many thanks!
18 months ago.
 Keith Burton
Keith Burton club
These solo standing stones don't look much, but you have to marvel at how long they've survived and wonder why they were put there in the first place. I'm guessing we'll never know for sure.

A lovely shot though Andy!
18 months ago.
Andy Rodker club has replied to Keith Burton club
I think they have a charm all of their own which is partly to do with the mystery and partly to do with the fact that they are all different from each other!
Thanks Keith!
17 months ago. Edited 17 months ago.
 tiabunna
tiabunna club
You have to wonder about the 'how' of these standing stones just as much as the 'why' .... fascinating.
18 months ago.
Andy Rodker club has replied to tiabunna club
They go deep into the ground, George.
17 months ago.
 Jenny McIntyre
Jenny McIntyre club
It is amazing how long those stones have stood silently there. I don't know how to pronounce Cornish Celtic, even though I'm Welsh and I could speak it when at school, not now though.
17 months ago.
Andy Rodker club has replied to Jenny McIntyre club
Not many do, Jenny. The last native Cornish speakers died out in the late 18th and early 19th centuries and were to be found in the West Penwith area (towards Land's End as you would expect). But the language never completely died; it was kept alive by a few victorian antiquarians and linguists and in the past 50 years or so there has been a growing interest in teaching it and learning it again. It is thought that over 500 people can converse in Cornish as a second language.
17 months ago. Edited 17 months ago.
 Eunice Perkins
Eunice Perkins club
I wonder how many people have stood looking at that stone and wondering!!
17 months ago.
Andy Rodker club has replied to Eunice Perkins club
Quite a few. It's near a lane that also leads to Mên-an-Tol holed stone ( www.ipernity.com/doc/2247598/45334508/in/album/1036932 ) and Boskednan (Nine Maidens) stone circle (no photo, sorry!)
17 months ago. Edited 17 months ago.
 polytropos
polytropos club
Obelix was here! :-)
17 months ago.
Andy Rodker club has replied to polytropos club
LOL!!
17 months ago.
 Andy Rodker
Andy Rodker club
ºººGreat comments from you all once again!! Many thanks!!ººº
17 months ago.

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