mrpb27

mrpb27

Posted on 01/23/2016


Photo taken on July 28, 2015




Keywords

pano
Kent
Folkestone
18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR DX
mrpb27
gcinfo
chunnel
D5200
Eurotunnel
Cheriton
PSE11
DxO Pro8
GCA2FA
tog
UK
train
panorama
transport
stitched
railway
terminal
virtual
overview
geocaching
cache
Nikon
England
oversikt


Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

124 visits

Chunnel terminal

Chunnel terminal
7 photo's corrected using DxO Pro 8 then stitched together using PSE11 to make this panoramic shot of the Folkestone channel tunnel railway terminal.
--------------------------------
The Euro-tunnel Folkestone Terminal is a railway terminal built for the transport of road-going vehicles on specially constructed trains through the Channel Tunnel.

The site covers nearly 350 acres (140 ha) in area, and is bordered by both Cheriton and Newington.
The tunnel was officially opened on 6 May 1994, with services between Cheriton and Coquelles beginning in July the same year, when the first freight shuttles started running. Passenger services then started in December 1994.

The terminal consists of eight island platforms, which are each 791 metres in length, with four overbridges connecting them to the motorway. The overbridges are located at approximately equidistant points along the length of the platforms so that vehicles have to drive for as little distance as possible along the platforms themselves; vehicles unloaded from the front to the middle of the train would use the furthest bridge, while those unloaded from the centre to the rear would use the next bridge in, and vice versa for those vehicles embarking. The bridges at the western end of the platforms are intended for embarking vehicles, while those at the eastern end are for those disembarking. The island platforms are separated by single track, allowing vehicles to access the train from both sides.

The terminal is located at the end of a loop connected to the route from the tunnel; trains exiting the tunnel travel clockwise around this loop and then pull into the terminal, meaning the locomotive that pulled the train will remain at the front for the next service through the tunnel. The terminal at Coquelles also has a loop arrangement, but instead trains travel anticlockwise; this is intended to ensure equal wear on the flange of the wheels.

The terminal has a larger loading gauge than the rest of the British network owing to the oversized trailers used to carry the road going vehicles.

Earthwatcher has particularly liked this photo


Comments
mrpb27
mrpb27
Thanks Anne.
This one didn't come out perfect but it's easy to miss the fault.
20 months ago.
Earthwatcher
Earthwatcher
Excellent, Ken!
It puts my journeys through the tunnel into a nice context.
20 months ago.
Trudy Tuinstra
Trudy Tuinstra
an excellent panorama
20 months ago.