mrpb27

mrpb27

Posted on 07/05/2014


Photo taken on July  5, 2014




Keywords

stone
D40x
Viking
Larvik
Vestfold
18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR DX
mrpb27
DxO Pro
Tjølling
PSE11
utsiktpunkt
scrubmill
Norge
Norway
pano
panorama
circles
viewpoint
stitched
graves
ship-shaped
mounds
deceased
burial
Nikon
Istrehågan


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Istrehågen_Panorama1

Istrehågen_Panorama1
A burial site consisting of three round, stone circles and 2 ship stone settings, as well as a raised stone (memorial). It has been investigated archaeologically and in the largest ship, signs of cremation were found. Among the discoveries made were a bone needle, bear claws, eagles bone comb and game pieces in bone, iron nails and shards of pottery all dating from the 4-500 century AD. In the circular stone settings there were also signs of cremations. North of the great ship in the early 1900s the remains of a so-called scrub mill for grinding grain was discovered.

Istrehågan burial ground is clearly visible on a ridge. Along this we find several tombs from the Iron Age. In the valley about 50 meters west of the field is a smaller burial mound and at Iver hill east of the field is another.

The position of these burial mounds were often in sight of a farm and visible from afar. They were considered a sign of social standing to those who came along the road, the sea or rivers. A monumental burial was a signal to strangers that they were approaching a rich farm with a strong family. Therefore the burial grounds were often in close proximity to transport routes; such as here on the ancient road through Tjølling, past Tjodalyng (Tjølling church) - Tveiten - Skalleberg over Istre and onto the Sandar. The road is still visible in the form of a trail east of the burial ground and in several places deep trenches (sunken roads) can be seen in the terrain south of stone settings.

It has been questioned whether or not the now lost Istre church or chapel, mentioned in the King's Letter from King Magnus in 1320 and the Red Book 1398 and burned in the 1560s, had been connected with the burials at Istrehågan. There is no evidence for this theory however.

Comments
Trudy Tuinstra
Trudy Tuinstra
nice and interesting
3 years ago.