David Hodson

David Hodson

Posted on 07/18/2015


Photo taken on January  7, 2010


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car
park
Flowers
Insects
Wild flowers
Bugs
Ragwort
British wild flowers
British insects


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Cinnabar moth caterpillar (Tyria jacobaeae)

Cinnabar moth caterpillar (Tyria jacobaeae)
Cinnabar moths are day-flying insects. Like many other brightly coloured moths, it is unpalatable; the larvae use members of the genus Senecio as foodplants. Many members of the genus have been recorded as foodplants, but for long-term population success, the presence of the larger species such as ragwort is needed. Smaller plant species, such as groundsel, are sometimes used, but since the species lays its eggs in large batches, survival tends to be reduced. Newly hatched larvae feed from the underneath of ragwort leaves within the area of their old eggs. The larvae absorb toxic and bitter tasting alkaloid substances from the foodplants, and assimilate them, becoming unpalatable themselves.The bright colours of both the larvae and the moths act as warning signs, so they are seldom eaten by predators.

Roy Lowry has particularly liked this photo


Comments
Roy Lowry
Roy Lowry
Excellent shot of the ragwort muncher.
2 years ago.
David Hodson has replied to Roy Lowry
Another one that I would collect as a kid, I love the colour of the moth, but they are very clumsy fliers.
2 years ago.