Diane Putnam

Diane Putnam

Posted on 05/16/2018


Photo taken on May 16, 2018


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The Royal Society For Putting Things On Top Of Other Things

Bungees II

Bungees II 


Graf Geo, Andy Rodker, John FitzGerald, Winscha and 3 other people have particularly liked this photo


8 comments - The latest ones
GrahamH
GrahamH
Occies.
6 months ago.
Diane Putnam has replied to GrahamH
Is that what you call them? I've never seen that word.
6 months ago.
GrahamH has replied to Diane Putnam
As in 'octopus straps'. Australian English is great at creating shortened forms ending in 'ies' or 'y'.
6 months ago.
Diane Putnam has replied to GrahamH
Ahhh...makes sense now. I take it that's what you call these instead of bungees, or maybe in addition to bungees.

Yes, it is, I've noticed! In my head I was pronouncing it "ossies."
6 months ago.
Andy Rodker
Andy Rodker
I thought caterpillars or snakes at first!
Now I understand why bungee-jumping is so called. This is the first time I have known what bungees are. Maybe we use the same word for these stretchy rope things in the UK, and maybe we don't. Never having had to buy one or use one I've never had any reason to think about it.
I had unthinkingly assumed that Bungee was the name of the first (mad) protagonist of the art of Bungee-jumping where it originated in New Zealand ... "Don't jump, Bungee!!!! AGHHH - He's gone and done it"
6 months ago.
Diane Putnam has replied to Andy Rodker
Lol! Wow, never heard of bungees. I looked up the etymology and there are slightly different nuances among the recognized dictionaries. tinyurl.com/yapwwesm

OnlineEtymology (US): "British schoolboy slang for "rubber eraser;" this probably is more or less onomatopoeic, from notions of bouncy + spongy. First record of bungee jumping is from 1979."

The Macquarie Dictionary (AU): "mate, friend. Used in North Queensland (Mareeba). May have aboriginal origins: Hey, bungee. How are you going?"

Oxford: "1930s (denoting an elasticated cord for launching a glider): of unknown origin."
6 months ago.
Graf Geo
Graf Geo
Slimey yikes
6 months ago.
Diane Putnam has replied to Graf Geo
Hahaha! Thank you, GG.
5 months ago.