See also...

PINK - ORANGE - RED PINK - ORANGE - RED


Rettet die Dinge Rettet die Dinge


Abandoned Places Abandoned Places


streets, urban landscapes streets, urban landscapes


Rusty & Ruins Rusty & Ruins


brown / marron brown / marron


l'insolite l'insolite


Façades du Monde Façades du Monde


Red Brick Red Brick


open daily open daily


Doors and Windows Doors and Windows


Abandoned Abandoned


See more...

Authorizations, license

Visible by: Everyone
All rights reserved

247 visits

Arch failure (PiPs)

Arch failure (PiPs)
NOTE to the concerned: The above is the back of an abandoned Arcade Hotel, built around 1900-1910. Some interior work on it happens in fits and starts, but with no resolution. This pattern is repeated in probably a half-dozen downtown brick behemoths. Some have always been occupied, others simply rot away.

I feel compelled to explain this damaged building to those of you who are shocked, puzzled, or concerned for my safety. I'm amused by it, because it tells me how accustomed I've gotten to this town in the nine years since I moved back to it. (I grew up here and I, too, was shocked that it hadn't changed one bit - in fact was worse!) Also, I'm wondering if there are no such signs of dereliction in your own cities or countries!

Klamath Falls, Oregon, has been, for as long as I can remember, a source of derision by the rest of the state. It is unique, because for its size, pop. about 40,000, it is unusually isolated and backward. It (meaning about 70% of the pop., I would guess) is disinterested in the outside world, in aesthetics, property maintenance and the natural environment. There is enough unemployment to make for a very poor tax-base for the city/county coffers. There is almost no industry, anymore, and I don't sense any urgency about courting industries, or even small businesses, because those are "outsiders." Strangers are unwelcome. There is an undercurrent of hyper-masculinity and even paranoia. I don't know if the KF culture was the same before the 1950s, but I suspect it was due to the highly negative remarks I heard about the place when I was a child. However, when my family left (thankfully) in 1962, Main St. shops and other businesses around town were fairly thriving. There were still jobs in the logging industry.

So, what you see above is normal for the city. Building fronts are usually passable, but walk down the alleys and you see the above. Most business spaces on Main St. are vacant and too old for anyone to be interested in restoration. (Also, what in the world would they do with all that space when they're done? There is no demand for hotels, upscale bars, restaurants, other kinds of retail business, adorable boutiques or cute little apartments. There is little need for "affordable housing" outside what is already available - and developers don't pour money into restoring old buildings like this in order to charge residents a few hundred bucks a month rent.)

Another factor: There was an earthquake in 1996, which severely damaged a few brick buildings, including the courthouse. I am sure that the whole downtown area was thoroughly inspected afterward, but I believe only the courthouse was demolished. I also believe most of the rest are still unreinforced to earthquake standards - a bit of rebar doesn't count in an earthquake! When these were built between the late 1800s and the early 1930s, I doubt there was extensive "engineering" and "inspecting" going on. Those were boom times and construction was going on at a furious pace. They would have been designed, perhaps by a real architect, then the masons and other construction workers would have handled the rest.

The above could have happened during the earthquake, backed into by a delivery truck, or a result of bad masonry combined with repeated freezing/thawing. Oh well, if not for these things, I would have even less to photograph than I already do! I've become very fond of these old brick buildings, grunge and all! For more of that sort of thing, see my Architecture and Dereliction albums.

Katja, David Hodson, John FitzGerald, Ronald Losure and 5 other people have particularly liked this photo


25 comments - The latest ones
 Pam J
Pam J club
Some nice old bricks there too !
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to Pam J club
Yes, they'd be great to recycle!
2 years ago.
 raingirl
raingirl club
yikes! do you think they had engineering to build that building? i always wonder when that requirement came into play.

there's an office building in portland that had the same type thing happen to the outer tiles. that building was quickly evacuated. not sure what it's fate is - though some street level businesses are open even though it isn't fixed yet!!
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to raingirl club
See the note added above. And, thank you!
2 years ago.
 Edward Bowthorpe
Edward Bowthorpe
Hope it does not full down,eddie,
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to Edward Bowthorpe
See the note added above. And, thank you!
2 years ago.
 Ulrich John
Ulrich John club
Very well seen, Diane ! Good Morning !
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to Ulrich John club
Vielen Dank, Ulrich!
2 years ago.
 Pat Del
Pat Del club
It's quite dangerous to walk near by this house (!)
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to Pat Del club
See the note added above. And, thank you!
2 years ago.
 Léopold
Léopold club
Watch your head Diane !!!!
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to Léopold club
See the note added above. And, thank you!
2 years ago.
 GrahamH
GrahamH club
From dust you were formed and to dust you return.
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to GrahamH club
Yes indeed, Graham, and thank you!
2 years ago.
 Ronald Losure
Ronald Losure club
I think it's time to knock this one down and start over. I agree with raingirl that a competent engineer may not have been consulted before starting construction.
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to Ronald Losure club
Um, it was "started" around 1900, so... See the note added above. And, thank you!
2 years ago.
 Keith Burton
Keith Burton club
Oh dear! It looks like the window frame is the only thing holding that up! Nicely taken Diane.........before it falls down.
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to Keith Burton club
It's an old, abandoned hotel, so I doubt anyone will be killed. Except for photographers! A lot of Main St. buildings are like this on the alley side. ;-( Thank you, Keith.

See the note added above.
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
Keith Burton club has replied to Diane Putnam club
I like the sign in the note...........we call them "Ghost Signs". It's good to get them on camera before they fade out completely.
2 years ago.
 John FitzGerald
John FitzGerald club
Bad bricklaying, wonderful sculpture.
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to John FitzGerald club
I wonder if it was hit by a delivery truck - it's in an alley behind Main St. Or, bad bricklaying! Thank you, John.

See the note added above.
2 years ago. Edited 2 years ago.
 Smiley Derleth
Smiley Derleth club
It hurts to see buildings in decline. Yet it is fascinating. Old, falling down buildings seem to tell a story; we can fill in the blanks ourselves. I love the ghost sign you put in the inset. A really nice one.
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to Smiley Derleth club
Thanks, Smiley! I'll be adding more examples of " busted brick" buildings, including more of the Arcade Hotel.
2 years ago.
 David Hodson
David Hodson club
It looks like my brick laying. Any way when are you going to run for Mayor. I'd vote for you if I could. :)
2 years ago.
Diane Putnam club has replied to David Hodson club
Ha! Yeah, that would be loads of fun, trying to govern a super-conservative city. Thank you, David!
2 years ago.

Sign-in to write a comment.