HFF everyone.  Arbroath Abbey Church

ANGUS



HFF everyone. Arbroath Abbey Church

The church was built in 1876-8 by James MacLaren of Dundee and incorporated parts of the pre-existing Georgian church on the site. On the gates are the 'Burning Bush' symbols of the Presbyterian Church. On top of the gates is the Thistle, the flower of Scotland. Flower of Scotland This National Anthem of Scotland always brings a lump to my throat.

Jaguar for Joe

As Dundee is currently Scotland’s only Go Ultra Low City and it now hosts this institution that is built on the harbour front, Jaguar felt that the I-Pace was a fitting exhibition for both the electric SUV and its world-renowned head of design Callum. By incorporating all the main stages of the design process, the sculpture stitches together different segments to create the I-Pace, including a clay section and a finished front-end. Courtesy of: www.carkeys.co.uk/news/jaguar-unveils-unique-clay-model-for-scottish-design-museum

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Dundee V&A

The V&A Dundee, designed by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, at a cost of £80 millionm is Scotland's first design museum. Located on the on the banks of the River Tay, it opened to the public on 15 September. Kuma designed the building to evoke the dramatic cliffs of Scotland's coastline. Built on reclaimed land, the museum stands at the centre of a £1 billion transformation of Dundee's former docks. The museum extends over the River Tay with a pointed corner that protrudes like the bow of a boat. This prow-shaped space contains the museum's large entrance space, cafe and shop, with timber walls the reference the building's concrete exterior cladding.

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V&A Interior

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The RRS Discovery

RRS Discovery is a barque-rigged auxiliary steamship built for Antarctic research, and was launched in 1901. It was built by the Dundee Shipbuilders Company, and its first mission was the British National Antarctic Expedition, carrying Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton on their first, and highly successful, journey to the Antarctic, known as the Discovery Expedition. The ship cost £34,050 to build, plus another £10,322 to be fitted with engines and machinery and more than £6000 for other equipment and fittings: The total cost for the Discovery was £51,000, equivalent to £4.1m in modern currency.

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Panmure Passage. Sculptor: Marion Smith

The sculpture is sited on the location of the slipway where the RRS Discovery was launched in 1901. Each cut out taken from the 11 upright slabs relates to a cross-section of the hull of the vessel. The title of the sculpture acknowledges Panmure Shipyards where the vessel was built by The Dundee Shipbuilders Company. It's possible to see 2 columns of the Tay Road Bridge through the sculpture. I loved this sculpture. It looked so unprepossessing at first, but was fascinating when one looked through it. Material: Norden Granite. Length 615cm Width 180cm Height 240cm www.marionsmithsculptor.co.uk/commissions/panmure-passage

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River Tay Rail Bridge

The Tay Bridge (or Tay Rail Bridge) is a railway bridge about two and a quarter miles (three and a half kilometres) long that spans the Firth of Tay in Scotland, between the city of Dundee and Wormit in Fife. It was opened on 20 June 1887. This 'new' double-track bridge was designed by William Henry Barlow. It was built by William Arrol & Co. 18 metres (59 ft) upstream of, and parallel to, the original bridge. The foundation stone was laid on 6 July 1883 and construction involved 25,000 metric tons of iron and steel, 70,000 metric tons of concrete, ten million bricks (weighing 37,500 metric tons and three million rivets. Fourteen men lost their lives during its construction, most by drowning. The original Tay Bridge was designed by noted railway engineer Thomas Bouch, It was a lattice-grid design, combining cast and wrought iron. The bridge was opened for passenger traffic on 1 June 1878. On the night of 28 December 1879 at 7.15 pm, the bridge collapsed after its central spans gave way during high winter gales. A train with six carriages carrying seventy-five passengers and crew, crossing at the time of the collapse, plunged into the icy waters of the Tay. All seventy-five were lost. The stumps of the original bridge piers, seen here, are still visible above the surface of the Tay even at high tide.

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Curlew

The curlew is the largest European wading bird, instantly recognisable on winter estuaries or summer moors by its long, down-curved bill, brown upper-parts and long legs.

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HFF and a good weekend to you all

Seaborne Ovation berthed at the Port of Dundee. I expect both these cruise ships unloaded some passengers who visited the new V&A museum. 2 days later we saw Seaborne Ovation anchored in the River Forth where it seemed that passengers were being ferried to and from the Port of Leith in Edinburgh. The slowdown in the North Sea oil and gas industry has led to fewer rigs being utilised. This has resulted in oil rigs being removed from the North Sea, with Dundee stepping up to provide a berthing place for them until they are required again in the future.
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