There are little grey slugs as well...in the garden. But I didn't bother with a photo of them 'cos they are very small and insignificant...still chomp their way anything edible that's been planted out though. And snails...I don't feel quite the loathing for snails that I do for slugs...it's only because they tend to be wearing pretty houses on their backs, not for any sinister sort of a reason.
And then there are cut worms which used to drive me to total despair when I was growing rows of veggies...anything planted out, because they don't bother if the plant was a seed you sowed and then grew...they homed in on cabbages which were their favourite...though they weren't fussy.
They are small and fat and grey...just like you'd imagine a grub to be...and they gnaw through the stem of freshly planted out plants and then the plant keels over and dies...which it would when you think about it. I'd practically sieve the soil to catch them but always managed to miss one or two and would go out in the morning to see a row of rapidly wilting cabbage or broccoli...
Cut worms hatch out into Crane Flies...those stupid leggy insects that crash into the overhead light at night and batter themselves senseless against windowpanes...when I had indoor cats the Crane flies would keep them entertained for hours on summer nights...they bat at them and catch them under their paws and then try to eat them...
Sometimes people think Crane flies are Daddy Longlegs...but they are different altogether...the Daddy Longlegs has a round body and his legs come out neatly and he doesn't appear until late summer...Crane flies legs are all over the place and they have tatty wings that don't work properly.
Cats and kittens are lethal in a patch of freshly turned earth...it makes the ideal seedbed for whatever you happen to be growing and the nicest cat litter for digging up and scattering the seeds you've so carefully sown absolutely everywhere...my rows of carrots were invariably wonky and usually had big gaps where there were no seeds at all...they'd been buried in cat pee or poo and stood little or no chance of ever germinating.
And of course anyone who has a dog and a cat will know most dogs adore eating cat poo and will happily munch away while standing right in the middle of your carefully raked and prepared seed bed...leaving great foot prints all over the place and scattering even more seeds to the winds when they see you coming and bolt for cover...
We don't have moles here in Ireland...they are the scourge of gardeners in England with their penchant for digging tunnels in beautiful green lawns and leaving heaps of earth dotted about...we were plagued by them in the last house we lived in...I resorted to asking a mole catcher to come and sort the little feckers out...he laid nasty traps all over the place and succeeded in catching a few, but some were wily and escaped the lure of the traps so in the end we learned to live with them...of course moleskin was much valued in Victorian days for making beautifully soft gloves for ladies and children. The fur is dense and jet black and very short...one country description for a mole is 'The gentleman in the velvet waistcoat'
I'm down to the last few pages of The Devil Rides Out...but I've downloaded To The Devil a Daughter...so I can go straight onto that...there's precious little on television. In fact last week we only watched a programme about the Tower of London...just as well we don't have to pay for a television licence.