Perhaps for the benefit of new friends ought to explain about our street.
It isn't a street actually. It's a very narrow lane with grass growing in the middle...room enough for one smallish car...no passing places, so if you meet Jonny on his tractor you make a dive for the nearest gateway...in Ireland, the term 'the street' applies both to the road outside the houses and to the immediate area around your home.
A Townland is an Irish measure of land...but in the way of the Irish it could be a Townland which is half a mile wide and deep...or somewhere covering many hundreds of acres...and each Townland has a name...so for those of you who write to me and wonder why the address is so long...that's why! To further confuse the issue there are Townlands within the towns as well...
There are only ten inhabited cottages in our street...with a field or two between each one, two empty houses...one is a semi-derelict and the other is almost completely derelict.
I suppose the street is about three-quarters of a mile long from the road into town...from our end it leads onto the bog road...there are no houses then for three miles...just wildlife and flowers.
Tom, Hubert and Jonny have cattle...beef or store cattle...and Tom is also a cattle dealer...Hubert works in the local feed mill and Jonny works in the farm supplies shop. Everyone else has donkeys and/or horses and every home has at least one dog...though Marian has nine...including Otto, the huge and fearsome Rottweiler...
The land is poor...covered in clumps of reeds mostly which resist all attempts to destroy them...the exception is the field next to us owned by Michael, that is in excellent condition due in part to hard work and grazing sheep on it...
We are a close-knit community...we look out for each other and help whenever it's possible to do so...and everyone gets along well...but we have little time for those who don't make an effort or who take on more than they are able for...this is where the problems begin with the new neighbours. Anyone with half an ounce of common sense would look at the land which goes with the cottage and think...a couple of goats perhaps...but not enough land for two feckin great horses.
Everyone has at least one dog...but they are kept behind gates...never allowed to roam freely...it simply isn't polite to let your dog chase everything that moves...not fair on the dog and not fair for you to have to swerve to avoid hitting it.
Electric fencing is bought by the metre...and it's cheap and easily available...looks rather like white tape. Turn the charge way up high and it'd keep a Rhino safe and secure...we used it for the donkeys before putting up wooden fencing and after the first shock they kept well away...
The nurse came to see me this afternoon and I mentioned the problems to her in respect of the children...she's going to make discreet inquiries...I was so relieved that she took me seriously...it can all too easily look like an interfering neighbour with nothing better to do.
So, that is an explanation of an Irish street...and a Townland...and will hopefully give you more of an understanding why everyone would be there in a flash if the occasion warranted it...but if you 'act the proper eejit and no mistake' you have to sort out your own problems whether that is lack of grazing for your animals because you simply didn't think about it properly...or because the owner of the forestry land is irate when you've cut his trees down for firewood.