I thought I'd explained it fairly clearly yesterday...about putting animals on trial in Mediaeval times...

You know it was quite ludricious to blame an animal...and I know it was...but people didn't then. They thought an animal had the ability to tell right actions from bad ones...they thought animals had the same moral compass as humans...we don't. The only reason we don't, is because we've grown and developed our understanding of how animal behaviour differs from ours.

And in a twist, we are only now coming to terms with the plain basic fact that animals ought not to be treated like objects for us to gawp at in zoos or inject with harmful chemicals in a laboratory.

Our understanding is growing painfully slowly...how long has it taken for cages for laying battery hens to be made slightly bigger? I remember discussions going on when I was a teenager...

It was only a few years ago that Mink and Silver Fox were farmed for their fur and killed by electrocution through a probe inserted into the anus...that, to me personally, is total madness when there is no longer any need or requirement to wear furs but for fashion...but with campaigning and a growing understanding of the 'wrongs' in the fur trade, the mink and fox farms are slowly closing down...

Horses don't panic quite so much if they are slaughtered out of sight of their companions waiting in line...but that was only discovered by accident, not through any kindness, when slaughtermen were getting badly injured by terrified horses.and began to close the doors between the waiting animals and those being destroyed...

Those judges who sat at a high table in a makeshift court room in some small village five and six hundred years ago and ordered a thief to have his right hand cut off or a woman to be burned at the stake...along with her Black cat and her pet toad...for being a so-called witch...who ordered a pig to be hung by the neck until dead because it had killed a baby in its crib...those judges were people of their times. Those were the penalities they imposed, because they were the punishments available for the time they lived in...

And what we don't know is how many of the judges comtemparies were horrified at animal trials and thought them quite obscene...we know public executions were thought a good way of spending the day by many...but we've no idea how many people stayed indoors and didn't let their children go out and maybe had meetings together to try to campaign against public displays of murder and cruelty.

The people of the Mediaval period were far from stupid or ignorant...it was their thinking and their understanding of the world about them which they misunderstood if you like...not through cruelty or ignorance but because that was the way things were done ...at the time.