This is Giles Allington who was a Knight...he lived from 1483-1522...his Father William Allington, died at the Battle of Bosworth Field. Giles was one of those ancestors which make my head spin when I read the second cousins etc...
I don't know anything about when these effigies were carved and put in place...no idea if you paid to have them made before you died or whether a member of your family arranged the carving and the installation. They do give you a good idea of the type of clothing in man in his position would have worn...and if you notice...his head is resting on the helmet he'd have worn for ceremonial and battle purposes.
And this is his son...also Giles, who lived from 1500-1586. Though I'd take the fact he lived for eighty-six years with a large pinch of salt! Practically all the dates for this period in history are approximate...or the favourite of the historian...about...shortened to abt.
You'll notice that son Giles has a ruff around his neck which would have been made from thick, heavily starched, linen and lace...it's pity the photograph doesn't show more of the rest of his body. He's lost the end of his nose unfortunately, but bearing in mind how long he and his Father have lain in a small village church in Cambridgeshire, I suppose it is more surprising they are so little damaged.

One of the more infuriating aspects of researching a family tree is that the further back one goes the easier it is to find information...especially when the branch of the family were noted down in Chancery Records and paid Hearth Tax and so on...I've found that this afternoon, when I was looking at the Allington family, that there were so many stories and so many records I became quite befuddled...there are upwards of three hundred people researching the same tree...each and every one has something slightly different to add...sorting out which is worth keeping and which to discard is problematic.
Thank heavens for those who trawl the tiny village Churches and take photographs of places I'll never visit...
It is actually much more difficult to get a start on a family who's members were 'ordinary'...and if you find no-one else is researching the same family line then it is more difficult than ever.
But these people who married at fourteen and ate with the King and entertained others of their ilk and went down in history books because of who they were and the houses they built...they are easy. I look at them sometimes and am over-whelmed with historical facts...one of the Allingtons died from the Plague...another went to France...poor William met his end from a sword thrust on a battlefield...Agnes died in childbirth at just eighteen...their lives, and those of their contemparies, intermingled constantly with a cousin marrying a second cousin and a widow marrying her husbands brother...
They built huge rambling houses in the English countryside which were later left to the Jackdaws and the Foxes and the thieves who stripped the roofs of the slates and stole away anything of value...or they were simply demolished and their estates which they'd cared for so well were broken up and sold off in lots to the highest bidder...
I feel an empathy with the girls who married young, full of hope and joy and ended their lives far too soon in the agonies of childbirth...for the widows who married again and again to keep their lands and their grand homes and watched while each husband died from wounds gained on battlefields or from some unidentifiable disease...leaving them with twelve surviving children and an estate to run...
We can get inside the minds of the Victorians...we know for certain what interested them...what appalled them...how they spent their days. But we know little about those who lived so long ago...those men who lie in quiet country churches immortilised forever in stone.